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Carol Anne

ISO-13346 Format?

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Now that Windows 7 is being ditributed with more than 6GB on a single DVD, we need to be able to read/write ISO-13346 media. Is there any chance of that being included in a future version?

 

For now, I'm using Nero's InCD v6.6; clumsy, but it appears to work.

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Now that Windows 7 is being ditributed with more than 6GB on a single DVD, we need to be able to read/write ISO-13346 media. Is there any chance of that being included in a future version?

 

For now, I'm using Nero's InCD v6.6; clumsy, but it appears to work.

 

What do you mean? UDF support or packet writing support?

 

ImgBurn supports UDF filesystem, but ImgBurn is not packet writing software like InCD.

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What do you mean? UDF support or packet writing support?

 

ImgBurn supports UDF filesystem, but ImgBurn is not packet writing software like InCD.

 

ISO-13346 is, according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Disk_Format, a change in on-disk format. As the Wiki points out, it is a successor to ISO-9660. Irrespective of whether data is written in packets or not, its the format that's the issue.

 

I'm curious whether the Data Type in ImgBurn 2.5 of "MODE2/FORM1/2542" is related? If so, what would be UDF Revision number to best select?

 

What I know is that a Dell-supplied Windows 7 Pro DVD is in ISO-13346 format. I have successfully read in and created an on-disk ISO of some 6,170,824,704 bytes. ImgBurn reports that intermediate file with File Sys: ISO9660 (Bootable), UDF (1.50). It has 3,013,098 sectors, LB=2,084,960, and size is 6,170,824,704 bytes. Clearly, an ISO9660 DVD has 4,700,372,002 bytes max, so the intermediate ISO I made of the original DVD won't fit. (I have successfully recorded it, in ISO9660, on a Dual-Layer DVD.)

 

It does not appear that ImgBurn recognizes the source ISO properly (reporting it as ISO9660, when it is known to be ISO13346.

 

I'm trying to figure out if this is an issue (ISO-13346 as successor to ISO-9660) that our honorable designer and implementer, LIGHTNING UK!, is conversant with, and has plans to add to ImgBurn, or not.

 

--Carol Anne

Edited by Carol Anne

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You're confusing disc capacity with file systems, which themselves don't have a disc size limit. Also a disc doesn't need to have only one filesystem.

 

If the source disc you're copying is dual-layer then you'll need a dual-layer blank to burn it.

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What do you mean? UDF support or packet writing support?

 

ImgBurn supports UDF filesystem, but ImgBurn is not packet writing software like InCD.

 

ISO-13346 is, according to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Disk_Format, a change in on-disk format. As the Wiki points out, it is a successor to ISO-9660. Irrespective of whether data is written in packets or not, its the format that's the issue.

 

I'm curious whether the Data Type in ImgBurn 2.5 of "MODE2/FORM1/2542" is related? If so, what would be UDF Revision number to best select?

 

What I know is that a Dell-supplied Windows 7 Pro DVD is in ISO-13346 format. I have successfully read in and created an on-disk ISO of some 6,170,824,704 bytes. ImgBurn reports that intermediate file with File Sys: ISO9660 (Bootable), UDF (1.50). It has 3,013,098 sectors, LB=2,084,960, and size is 6,170,824,704 bytes. Clearly, an ISO9660 DVD has 4,700,372,002 bytes max, so the intermediate ISO I made of the original DVD won't fit. (I have successfully recorded it, in ISO9660, on a Dual-Layer DVD.)

 

It does not appear that ImgBurn recognizes the source ISO properly (reporting it as ISO9660, when it is known to be ISO13346.

 

I'm trying to figure out if this is an issue (ISO-13346 as successor to ISO-9660) that our honorable designer and implementer, LIGHTNING UK!, is conversant with, and has plans to add to ImgBurn, or not.

 

--Carol Anne

 

As I have told you before, ImgBurn supports UDF, versions 1.02, 1.5, 2.0, 2.01, 2.5 and 2.6, to be exact.

 

Regarding ISO 9660, the filesystem itself has no disc size limit, it has a single file limit of 4 GB, because a 32 bit value is used in the file descriptor table to represent file size. For example, ISO 9660 disc can be 25 gb in size, but no file on that disc may be larger than 4 gb.

 

As mmalves pointed out, a single disc may have multiple filesystems on it, including ISO9660 + UDF, which ImgBurn correctly reported.

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Hi all, I have some questions:

 

1) Is Win7 in ISO-13346 format? Is there ISO-9660 format of Win7 ?

 

2) It seems that ImgBurn lets all iso format be ISO-9660 and burn them, is this true?

 

3) If Win7 is in ISO-13346 format, once I burn it as ISO-9660, will sth be affected? (Not bootable for OLD computers, open file error occurs in Windows, etc)

 

4) How to choose specific ISO format to burn (if the answer for Question 2 is false)?

 

Thanks for reading and answering my questions!

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If you have a win7 ISO image then it'll be burned as it is, i.e. no changes are made by ImgBurn.

 

Now, if you're creating an ISO image from the installation files then you should follow this guide.

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