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Shelf Life of a burned CD/DVD

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What is the useful shelf-life of a typical burned CD or DVD? Is there any

real research that covers this issue? How long before uncorrectable

errors appear on the media?

 

I did a web search on the topic, and the answers I see are all over the map.

 

I'm sure there are many factors involved, and it's probably not a simple

question.

 

Still, it seems to me that the folks who come out with "hundreds of years"

might be confusing burned CDs/DVDs with conventionally "pressed" media.

 

As for myself, I'll feel lucky if they perform well after ten years of sitting around

at room temperature. At the point where things start degrading, if I'm still

interested in retaining the files, I'll simply burn them to new media, whatever

form that may take ten years down the road.

 

On a semi-related note, I'm curious about what type of error-correction is

currently used on data CDs/DVDs. When I was into digital audio back in

the 80s, I often read about Reed-Solomon Cross-Interleave Code. However,

I'm not sure this technology migrated from audio CDs to media holding data.

I can see from using utilites like Nero CD/DVD speed that errors seem to be

detectable, and to some degree are correctable, but I'm not sure about

the algorithm being used.

 

Regards,

 

Thomas

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All I can say is a major factor in determining the shelf life of dyed media is who made the media. I've seen cheap ass manufacturers like Vanguard whose DVD-R's were unreadable after a year. Besides, most of those how long they last values, when testing any product, aren't based on actual time spent but on estimation. i.e. they haven't had the time to test it for 10 years to see if it lasts for 10 years because if they did they'd never get products to market.

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Actually, I may have some solid data for you. I came across, just now, a DVD I know I burned over 5 years ago. So, I opened its contents in Windows Explorer and checked the folder date for VIDEO_TS. It was 11-03-2004. The media was a RiData DVD-R, so, they last at least 8 years just sitting in a box.

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M-Disc is the new 'long life' media.

 

http://millenniata.com/

 

Very cool. I'm definitely interested.

 

Judging by the Wiki article, the technology made its debut several years ago. I'm surprised

it hasn't become more widely known by now.

 

Thomas

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So, it seems you need a separate drive to write to these discs, but, the media, once written, will apparently read in any DVD+R read capable drive.

 

 

I had not heard of this technology before, either.

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So, it seems you need a separate drive to write to these discs, but, the media, once written, will apparently read in any DVD+R read capable drive.

 

 

I had not heard of this technology before, either.

 

I just received a pair of LG GH24NS90 burners that I ordered. Although the manufacturer does not include any

specifications regarding burn speeds for this media in their data sheet, they claim that they are M-Disc compatible,

and the drives have the M-Disc logo silkscreened on the front panel.

 

Once I install them and receive some M-Discs to burn, I'll post back with the results.

 

Enjoy the day.

 

Thomas

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