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Writing to the end of the disc - Myth or Truth?

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Hello folks!

 

I have heard somewhere that if you write a CD-R until the end of the disc,

it will make it last even longer than leaving unburned space in it.

 

Is there any truth in it?

The reason I ask is because I am authoring a CD-R with a 8MB image file,

and I'd be interested in making any move to make this last as long as it can,

since it will be left in a Library for a long time.

 

For this occasion, I acquired Verbatim Genuine AZO CD-Rs. 
So if burning to the end is true, then It would be a waste of effort not to make use of this trick.

 

Thanks for any elucidation around this!

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I would check the MID in ImgBurn for these Verbatim discs.  I've not used their AZO discs but I don't get Verbatim CD-R's because the ones I got and returned were made by CMC Magnetics.  CMC is the worst, bottom of the barrel optical disc manufacturer.  They can't be trusted, especially if you're after long term archival storage.

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They are genuine Mitsubishi Chemicals.

They have a dark blue cyan reflective layer.

I even destroyed one with a scissor - the label layer is far more resistant than Maxell's from Japan (Taiyo Yuden).

 

Optiarc DVD RW AD-7240S 1.01 (ATA)
Current Profile: CD-R


Disc Information:
Status: Complete
State of Last Session: Complete
Erasable: No
Sessions: 1
Sectors: 4,608
Size: 9,437,184 bytes
Time: 01:03:33 (MM:SS:FF)
MID: 97m34s23f (Mitsubishi Chemical Corp.)
Supported Write Speeds: 8x; 16x; 24x; 32x; 40x; 48x

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MCC is definitely a good dye manufacturer.  Notice how CMC rearranges the letters of a reputable maker so they try to fool people?  :busted:

 

 

Even Memorex, which normally uses CMC for its media, used it for its 24x CD-RW's.  Unfortunately, Verbatim also outsources some of its CD-R and its BD-RE's to them.  >:p

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MCC is definitely a good dye manufacturer.  Notice how CMC rearranges the letters of a reputable maker so they try to fool people?

 

 

I'm not sure if I understand. Are you saying the discs I have are fake and CMC?

I can provide media photo if you wish...

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I was saying CMC named themselves an anagram of MCC to make it look like they were something in the same league.  That may be why MCC also decided to use MKM.  To help further distinguish themselves from the crap that is CMC.

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Going back to your initial question, I don't see why that would be the case.

 

I know double discs are meant to be more 'readable' when both layers contain the same amount of data, but obviously that doesn't apply to single layer media.

 

I'm no expert on the technical / scientific properties of media though, so if someone who has that level of knowledge tells you otherwise, take their word for it!

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Late to the party, but yes there is truth the the "end-of-disc" question; at least, when I'm able to visually see irregularities near the edges of discs, I start not to trust them. Next, if you drop a disc and it falls on edge, guess where the damage is most likely to manifest itself as a problem? Finally, in theory all discs are perfectly manufactured, such that the holes are exactly on-center and the discs themselves are perfectly round. But if there is ANY imperfect in this regard, the error will be most noticeable at the outer edge where "wobble" may be intolerable for some players/lasers.

 

If you are making discs to save e.g. precious photos for long-term storage, you will spend $65 bucks on an LG M-Disc recorder and buy some M-Discs. They do not use inks/dyes at all but instead materials that effectively "etch your data in stone" and should last 10x your lifetime (milleniata.com).

 

I have no affiliation with milleniata but have an LG burner and have made some M-Disc (blu-ray data) discs for keeping archival copies of our pics/videos/docs using ImgBurn. I expect these never to change in any way i.e. remain perfect for the rest of my days.

Edited by laserfan

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Ok folks,

 

Thanks for your replies.

This MDISC really looks interesting. I haven't seen this before...

I read some US military force tested several brands under extreme condition and these ones were the only ones to survive.

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One of the few things I find going for LG Blu-Ray burners.  They support MDISC.  I've never actually burned one but they sound good for long term storage.  As long as your DVD player reads DVD+R, it should read DVD_Video discs burnt on MDISC media.

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One of the few things I find going for LG Blu-Ray burners.  They support MDISC.  I've never actually burned one but they sound good for long term storage.  As long as your DVD player reads DVD+R, it should read DVD_Video discs burnt on MDISC media.

 

If I were a videographer and/or made precious family home videos I would certainly be using Mdisc exclusively for archival storage.

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