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AlbertEinstein

Is it "theoretically" possible to salvage a bad optical disc by bypassing bad sectors?

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I have burned lots of BD-R single layer discs from Optical Quantum successfully. But today, as of the moment, was not one of those successful burns. The BD-R burning process failed after only finishing about 20% of the entire 25GB of data I had prepared for burning (see the embedded image). The software asked me if I wanted to finalize the disc so that I could use what little data was on the disc that had burned before the failure. So, I accepted the software request and now have a readable BD-R disc that has about 5GB of readable data on it. I'll just nick name this one disc DVD+R.

 

Zy5J7fS.jpg

 

With so much un-burned, unused and potentially good usable sectors left on the disc, as can be seen from the image, is there some way to exploit this partial successful burn to it's fuller potential? Because of my high percentage of successful BD-R burns in the past I am wondering if this happened as a result of a dust particle I failed to see on the disc? Normally, I'll take a fresh blank disc from the original disc spindle and put it straight into the optical drive tray. This time because I was in between two places and only wanted to transport a couple of discs, I had put this blank BD-R into an empty single jewel case and left it stored there for a few months.

 

It seems such a waste to not make any attempts to get past the one bad sector (or bad group of sectors) on an optical media and finish using what space is left. Is it possible? If it's not possible via a current standard is it something that might be possible in an evolving or future standard? And lastly, would it be possible to write to those unused sectors in a non-standard manner? From what very little I know of optical media I think it's possible to use most of the rest of the good unused readable sectors on a partially failed burn. One should be able to simply query for the good sectors by performing some kind of disc scan.

 

What if we were to pretend that the recording area started much further away from the theoretical center of the media. We could just pretend the first good sector to write too starts in an area past the already burned sectors and begin there, yes?

 

But these are my thoughts from my limited knowledge. What do the experts say?

 

**EDIT**: Lastly, I looked at the ImgBurn log file and there's really no good data there about what happenend. All it says is that my "close request was acknowledged"???? Yeah, per your close recommendation!!!! What up???!!! Oh yes, if my memory serves me correctly, this software records nothing if the burn process fails. That approach was not good in the past and I don't like it now. So, there is basically no log for me.

Edited by AlbertEinstein

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That disc is done now, you can't burn anything else to it.

I could do lots of stuff to it if I really wanted to. Why do you steal my hopes away so apathetically? There are still good sectors on the disc. :whatever:

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I'm sorry but 'finalised' really does mean finalised... as in nothing else can be written to it.

 

Yes, from an ISO standards perspective, I have no argument with you about that. But don't be so little-minded. Of course, a person could use those good sectors if he really wanted too. In a non-standard way. Acknowledge that now or look like a fool for life.

 

In fact, I want you to be the person that writes the software that does this for me so that I can use those good sectors. I know you can do this. You have the knowledge to do this for me, for us all. Make it so!

Edited by AlbertEinstein

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