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fgranlund

"Found 1 DVD-ROM!" but "No Writers Detected!"

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The ImgBurn Log reports finding a burner, but the program insists there isn't one. Does it think a DVD-ROM isn't a DVD burner? That is certainly incorrect.

 

How do I convince the program to detect the drive it's already found??

 

 

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Until we see the log, about the only thing I can say is maybe it isn't burner but a read only (ROM) drive.  If it is a read only drive, it will find a DVD-ROM but no writers because there are none.  The log will list the ID string of the drive, which will tell us what the drive is.

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I tried attaching the log printout as a screenshot, but that apparently doesn't work. So - here it is:

 

I 09:55:44 ImgBurn Version 2.5.8.0 started!
I 09:55:44 Microsoft Windows XP Professional (5.1, Build 2600 : Service Pack 3)
I 09:55:44 Total Physical Memory: 2,620,912 KiB  -  Available: 1,356,532 KiB
I 09:55:44 Initialising SPTI...
I 09:55:44 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices...
I 09:55:44 -> Drive 1 - Info: MS C/DVD-ROM 3.0 (D:) (ATA)
I 09:55:44 Found 1 DVD-ROM!
 
The DVD drive is indeed a writer, and has made dozens of CDs and DVDs. Thanks for your help!

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You'd better check in Device Manager because your writer isn't being made available to the program.

 

I'm not sure what that 'MS C/DVD-ROM' is. Possibly a virtual drive of some sort?

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If ImgBurn had made discs with this drive before, then there's a configuration error somewhere.  The ID string of the drive seems to be a generic one, so Windows doesn't seem to think it's an available writer.

 

 

Have you tried using Windows' built in writing to write a disc and see if it works?  Use a rewritable one if you have one available to save using a disc.  If Windows won't right to it, then Windows thinks the drive is not a writer but a reader.

 

 

Now, there's always the chance the drive could have gone bad and needs replacing.  However, generally, Windows shouldn't rethink itself if that happens to a drive and call it what it isn't.  Windows would just generally keep the old settings even if the drive stopped working correctly.

 

 

As LUK said, check Device Manager to check the drive's status.

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