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DTS FILE BURNING TO DTS AUDIO CD

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I've searched quite a bit for a solution to my problem.

I'm trying to burn a DTS 5.1 audio file to a DTS 5.1 audio CD which I can play and decode through my audio system. 

The error is E 10:19:56 Reason: No combination of intermediate filters could be found to make the connection.

VLC plays the file, and the CODEC tab there shows it to be 96Khz 32 bit audio stream. I believe VLC uses something beyond DirectShow filters.

Any ideas how to burn these types of files?

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You probably just need to install the proper filters for ImgBurn to create a CD from.

 

What file type are the source files?  MP3?  FLAC?  etc.  Depending on the file type, you may need specific filters for a particular file type.

 

If you can't get that work, what might work is converting the files from one type to another, even if it's just from MP3 to MP3, the same file type, etc.  Not all files are created equal and not always compliant with their specs.  What happens when I have a file I can't get ImgBurn to make an audio CD out of, converting the file to another file type generally works.  There are all kinds of freeware software converters out there.

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Thanks dbminter. The file extension is .DTS. 

I have some .DTS files that are 44.1k 32 bit that burned with no issues, so I guess the sample rate is the problem.

I've never tried to convert a file's sample rate. Anyone else done this? I only have about 20 files to do so I'm looking for a no cost solution.

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Hm, I've never heard of a .DTS file, so I don't know if anything can convert them at all.

 

And, I don't see DTS as a file type of filter you can install from the Guide here:

 

So, that's about the extent of my advice, sorry.

 

You could try this:

https://www.media.io/convert/dts-to-dts.html

 

Of course, there are problems with online converters.  The file may not transfer correctly and you'll end up with a file that is corrupt.  But, it appears to be free and supports converting DTS to many file formats like MP3 and FLAC.

Edited by dbminter

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It's the DTS equivalent as .ac3 for Dolby Digital. DTS is an alternate audio option for movies

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Burning it as an Audio CD will convert it to normal CD-DA format. i.e. 44khz, 16bit, stereo.

I do not know the method used to make these so called DTS Audio CDs.

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So, it looks like he'll have to convert the DTS to FLAC (For lossless from the source.) because he can't seem to get his source files to input.  That's what I have to do whenever ImgBurn encounters a file it won't convert.

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I'm not an expert on the DTS disc, but it was created around the turn of the century as a method of recording 5.1 sound on standard 650MB cd. A standard cd player will reproduce a potentially speaker destructive stereo white noise, but this is actually a 5.1 dts encoded signal that can be decoded on the proper dvd player / receiver combination. I have several of these in .WAV files, and a few that are in .DTS files. I'm able to burn the .WAV files with no problem. They play 5.1 sound as expected.

I'm able to burn .DTS files that are sampled at 44.1k, but not the higher sampled 96k files. That makes me think that the sample rate is the problem. 

Here's a line from the log for one .DTS file that I've burned successfully:
I 15:43:53 Writing Track 1 of 1... (AUDIO/2352, DTS, LBA: 0 - 16949)
Does that mean that .DTS is recognizable for DirectShow, and therefore a different filter is not the answer?

Also, does my audio file have to be 44.1k 16 bit?

Thanks all

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Well, as for direct DTS input, I wouldn't know, but I'd think if you converted the DTS to FLAC, you'd have the same audio details without loss and wouldn't have to worry if it's 44.1k 16 bit.  You'd have to install the filters for FLAC, but I use FLAC all the time because it's lossless.  Even when I have an MP3 that won't import, I convert it to FLAC, even though I'm not gaining anything above the source MP3 attributes.

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Can you use MediaInfo on the wav file one and post the details about it please?

If the DTS is a 'raw' format (no headers etc to remove), you could try naming it as such. If the file has a .RAW extension, ImgBurn shouldn't try to process it via DirectShow / ACM.

It'll then just read 2352 bytes from the file, ask the drive to burn it to a sector 'as-is' and then repeat over and over again until the end of the file/disk.

 

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