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montmorency

How essential is tray-cycling?

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Hi,

 

Not totally a newbie to imgburn, but a newbie to the forum and to the newer versions of imgburn.

 

I currently work exclusively on laptops, and as the program itself acknowledges, on laptops it can open the tray, but usually cannot close it again (never closes on my two laptops).

 

I just wondered how essential this tray cycling was, and would it be possible to optionally avoid it (e.g. with a tick box)?

 

It would be nice to be able to leave a burn to itself to both burn and verify (which I always do) to complete without having to be around to close the draw after the burn and before the verify.

 

 

Regards,

M.

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I think it's important - otherwise I wouldn't make the program do it by default!

 

You probably want the 'cycle tray before verify' checkbox in the Settings on the Write tab.

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I think it's important - otherwise I wouldn't make the program do it by default!

 

You probably want the 'cycle tray before verify' checkbox in the Settings on the Write tab.

 

Thanks LUK.

 

Edit/Update: I was going to ask why it was necessary, but I have now found out why, with a search.

 

Mea culpa: I should have searched before.

 

Thanks for your time.

Regards,

M.

Edited by montmorency

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I think it's important - otherwise I wouldn't make the program do it by default!

 

You probably want the 'cycle tray before verify' checkbox in the Settings on the Write tab.

 

Thanks LUK.

 

Edit/Update: I was going to ask why it was necessary, but I have now found out why, with a search.

 

Mea culpa: I should have searched before.

 

Thanks for your time.

Regards,

M.

 

It's been awhile since I researched it, but it was something about "clearing buffers" if I remember correctly. Anyway, I disabled the tray cycling for my external USB pioneer drives and have never had a problem with the disc verifying correctly against the image....unless of course not clearing buffers can lead to a false good verification report!....

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It's the reading of the TOC that drives normally fail on.

 

If you don't cycle the tray then the drive just uses what it has in memory and you'll never know if it can actually read it until the next time you put the disc in the drive - only to find it doesn't work!

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It's the reading of the TOC that drives normally fail on.

 

If you don't cycle the tray then the drive just uses what it has in memory and you'll never know if it can actually read it until the next time you put the disc in the drive - only to find it doesn't work!

 

So, even if ImgBurn is set to do a sector-by-sector copy, the TOC itself is outside the actual data area, or is within it but read from memory instead of the sector in which it is contained?

 

Sounds like I need to reconsider if that is the case. It's really not that much of a problem with standard try type drives, but it is a bit of a hassle on laptop drives where the tray needs to be pushed back in, as the OP stated. Hmmm, I've never had a slot loading writer, but it makes me wonder how that would work...

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Yeah, it's not part of the user data area.

 

The drive initialises the disc from special areas when it's first inserted and if they're unreadable then the disc isn't made available to *any* software - making the disc 110% useless.

 

In that situation the drive will report something like 'medium not present' (even when it obviously is!) or 'unable to recover TOC'.

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Hm, just a thought, but isn't it possible to send a "reset device" command of some sort, to accomplish the same effect? I've seen drives reset by software before, where they act like they were just powered on...

 

It may not work with all devices, but for those it does (perhaps laptop drives?) it could save a bit of hassle over popping the drive back in...? Just a thought :)

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Normally the drives reset after a firmware update - but that's due to their internal code and not something I can tell them to do.

 

A bus reset isn't something you want to do if you can ever avoid it.

 

Ejecting + reinserting is the best way by far.

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