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jedanglupan

Safest way to store data on CD/DVD's

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Hi there,

 

I'm trying to write a proposal on how to backup some very important files off of our servers. The files are all at least 1 year old and are just hogging space on the server, but they still need to get accessed from time to time by very few personnel.

 

At the moment our strategy is to burn 3 DVD/CD's of the data files.

 

One is sent off office premises.

One is kept in a safe location at the office.

And the last is given to the person that worked on the project the most.

 

Now that's all fine and dandy but I'm looking for the most safe (least corruption) way of writing data to CD's or DVD's.

 

What kind of file system should I use? Joliet? UDF? ISO 9660? All?

What brand of DVD/CD should I use?

What kind of restrictions should I put on the file system?

Is there an easy way to check that the files are all correct? Is it 100% accurate?

 

If any of you have some suggestions or comments I would love to hear them.

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What kind of file system should I use? Joliet? UDF? ISO 9660? All?

 

All

 

What brand of DVD/CD should I use?

 

Verbatim or Taiyo Yuden

 

What kind of restrictions should I put on the file system?

 

Restrictions? If you talking about the ones ImgBurn mentions, just leave it on the defaults as they're the ones that comply with the specs.

 

Is there an easy way to check that the files are all correct? Is it 100% accurate?

 

Enable 'Verify' when you burn.

 

Then double check the entire folder structure via something like 'Beyond Compare'.

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And scan your burns using DVDInfoPro or OptiDrive Control.

 

Regards

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Include a checksum file so integrity can be confirmed after data has been moved around. Corz Checksum is what I've started using... just rightclick and it'll checksum or verify an entire directory tree.

 

Directory depth, folder or filename length or foreign characters can cause problems. Creating a multipart archive file (zip, rar...), or using backup software should preserve those names and paths. An archive may be preferable, unless you use a widely available and standardized backup app like the one built into Windoze. Archives and backup apps should also do some checksum verification of file integrity. And if there's folders with gazillions of small or compressible files, it could save time and media space.

 

I'd use two or three different brands of media. There's always a risk of getting counterfeit or defective media if you stick with one brand. Verify disks on a different reader.

 

Hopefully there is some filing system that will help someone locate this data two years from now, even if everyone involved now has been fired or had their brains eaten by zombies.

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