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Struggling to create CD player compatible media


ASF
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23 minutes ago, dbminter said:

I've always used madFLAC for ImgBurn to convert my FLAC's.  I've never come across any high resolution ones, though, apparently, as all the FLAC's I've ever fed ImgBurn with madFLAC "installed" worked.

 

Yeah, I am not surprised it works because I would imagine anything that can convert standard FLAC (which apparently you used) back to a standard audio CD WAV file will just work since it converts from one standard file (FLAC) back to another (WAV).

but given the OP's comment... while apparently 'madFLAC' does convert from FLAC to WAV, the WAV files created from the hi-res FLAC files still remain hi-res when they are now WAV files which won't work with a standard audio CD. that's why it's always best to have standard 16-bit/44.1kHz FLAC files as whatever you convert to from these will be standard files you know will work in general with random devices since we have had that 16-bit/44.1kHz standard on audio CD's since I want to say the 1980's or so.

p.s. but I am using ImgBurn on Linux and I don't have 'madFLAC' installed so I just convert with Foobar2000 so it's nice and easy for ImgBurn to work with the WAV files as is with no conversion needed on the ImgBurn side of things.

Edited by ThaCrip
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Knowing what I know now about high resolution files being a problem, I'd convert them to lossless WAV files first and then use those for input into ImgBurn.  I remember as a general rule, whenever I get some MP3's from like an online store, I'd always convert them to MP3 first because usually half of them would be authored incorrectly and fail to import into ImgBurn.  So, as counterproductive as it sounds, I'd convert from MP3 to MP3, which always resulted in input files being accepted.

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I maintain hi-res FLAC files since I primarily use them to stream lossless audio via my audio streamer (Naim NDX2) which can play such files.  I make CDs infrequently, usually to share music that I have purchased with friends. 

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Actually, what is the definition of a "high resolution" FLAC?  I create FLAC's from my audio CD's, but I always use no compression.  Are those "high resolution" FLAC's?

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2 minutes ago, ASF said:

I maintain hi-res FLAC files since I primarily use them to stream lossless audio via my audio streamer (Naim NDX2) which can play such files.

I see. that's fine. but I would imagine that Naim NDX2 can play standard FLAC files to?

I get that nowadays storage space ain't as much of a problem as it used to be but if a person has a lot of hi-res files that will begin to add up as taking a quick look at one thing I got on my hard drive with the 24bit/96Hz it's 54min2sec in length at almost 1.2GB in size. but after converting that to standard FLAC the file size drops to 355.1MB in size. so it's about 3.3 times smaller and that's just one album as if a person has many of these that will begin to burn up several GB's fairly quickly. but I guess with storage space nowadays being several TB at a reasonable price, people may not care about the storage space savings. but I prefer the efficiency, especially with people who don't have money to burn ;)

but after taking a quick search online for that Naim NDX2 looks like a very expensive device, so given that info, I suspect you don't care in the slightest about storage space since a few hard drives will be like nothing to you if you dropped that much $ on that.

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9 minutes ago, dbminter said:

Actually, what is the definition of a "high resolution" FLAC?  I create FLAC's from my audio CD's, but I always use no compression.  Are those "high resolution" FLAC's?

I would imagine pretty much anything above the 16-bit/44.1kHz standard.

I would definitely use some level of compression when making FLAC from audio CD's as it seems many opt for the 'level 5' since it offers a good balance of file size/decompression speed. basically that's the trade offs... higher compression saves storage space but slightly sacrifices decompression speed and vice versa. but we are not talking any major differences here. I just opt for max compression of 'level 8' since I would rather a save a little space.

that's the whole point of keeping FLAC instead of WAV. it's about half of the storage space at identical sound quality.

p.s. keep in mind compression or not on a FLAC file the audio itself is still identical to the original as it's a lossless format as I suspect some seem to think any compression loses audio quality, but it does not.

Edited by ThaCrip
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