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8x listed as supported write speed for 2.4x media


Tor
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Greetings! I have been burning DVD media since the first ±R writers came on the market, but I have never attempted Dual Layer before today. I have just acquired a Plextor PX-810SA and a 25-pack of Verbatim DVD+R DL discs.

 

What confuses me though, is the write speeds listed by ImgBurn. When a blank disc is inserted, ImgBurn shows the following:

Supported Write Speeds: 2.4x, 4x, 6x, 8x

 

The package says that the discs only support 2.4x. The media identifier is MKM-001-00

 

The PX-810 supports 18x write speeds for single layer media and 10x for double layer media, and is supposedly able to reliably burn 16x media at 18x.

 

2.4x media at 8x seems like a bit of a stretch, though... especially considering the price for DL media.

 

Any input is greatly appreciated.

Edited by Tor
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welcome to the forum

 

it's just a matter of how good the 2.4x verb DL is and how burners have improved, that overspeeding is enabled with firmware

 

It's probably safer to limit burn speeds to 4x tho. You could always test 6x or 8x.

 

The 2.4x burn speed probably won't give you any better burns than the 4x.

 

 

http://club.cdfreaks.com/showthread.php?t=223008

 

you couldn't just buy the pioneer model and cut out the middleman?

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D'oh!

I feel a little cheated... if I'd done my homework better I could have saved the equivalent of $30 and gotten another drive. The readily available alternatives where I live would have been NEC and Samsung.

 

Anyway...

I am aware that the drive's firmware decides which write speeds to support for a given disc - and dontasciime is right: Nero reports the same supported speeds as ImgBurn for these discs.

 

Seeing as the PX-810 is actually Pioneer DVR-212, the closest match in cornholio7's very thorough tests would be the DVR-111. It seems like burning at 8x is actually feasable but not optimal. It also looks like 4x produces somewhat better results than 2.4x (I might be interpreting the results wrong, though)

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