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dbminter

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About dbminter

  • Birthday 01/25/1974

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  1. madFLAC isn't perfect. There have been some FLAC I've come across that it would not process, so I converted them to uncompressed WAV for input.
  2. I don't use LAV. I use madFLAC to do my FLAC processing to make Audio CD's in ImgBurn. In all the time, like 15 years or so, I've been using madFLAC, I've never had it interfere with any audio processing in ImgBurn or any other audio/video application I've used.
  3. To copy CD Audio discs, you use the Read function as defined in the first link in the first Guide I pasted:
  4. The PS2 laser assembly base unit would be newer than the ones in the PS1. In theory, that would mean better read compatibility. I know that certain DVD-R could be played on the PS2 for things like DVD Video. I used to do it as far back as 2002, but, even then, random skips and playback problems would occur because the PS2 was simply designed before the creation of DVD-R. However, future PS2 models improved playback compatibility with DVD-R, which means that as the lasers got newer, they got better at reading recorded discs. Which would bolster the idea that as the PS2 improved, it would have better playback for CD-R.
  5. Yeah, that's the ASUS I have bookmarked to try out in November. Someone else on this board had tried it out and it seemed to do the trick for solving their issue. I just never have had any BD-R DL before. Just BD-RE DL. I needed rewritables for monthly system backups so I could reuse the discs and my backups were all larger than a BD-RE SL. I've since moved to USB SSD's because they're much larger and read and write much faster. I also as a matter of "trust" that I only use DL media when I have to. Like for those backups I mentioned or DVD+R DL for DL DVD Video discs. When you go beyond one layer, you double the chances of having a read issue, right at the layer change(s) most often than not, as seemed to be happening in your case. So, I could have saved space with BD-R DL discs for backups which also would have read and written faster than the rewritable DL's, but I didn't want to run the risk of, years later down the road, a backup being unreadable. So, I stuck with single layer BD-R. To put it into perspective, in the 10 years or so I've been burning BD-R's for backups, I only just a few weeks ago encountered my first that wouldn't read. And that was something I "knew" years ago when I wrote it. The drive was dying and there was a recovered read error during Verify on burn. I performed a manual Verify on that same disc and it passed that time. However, that drive that burned it was replaced shortly after that due to various Verify failures on future burns. I should have burned the data again in the replacement drive while I had live copies, but I didn't. Thankfully, it was temporary files that I managed to recover from other sources a few weeks ago, so I didn't lose anything.
  6. The actual drive in the OWC setup is an LG. I'm not familiar with that particular brand, but I do know the WH16NS40 did not properly write to BD-R DL and BD-RE DL. 9 times out of ten, they would fail verifies. Now, that was some years ago, so a firmware update to LG drives like the NS40 might have fixed it. The issue wasn't present in the NS60, but LG discontinued that model. You could try seeing if there's a firmware update for your drive. In Write mode, right click on the drive from the drop down menu and select the last option in the context menu, the one to check for a firmware update. Install the latest one if there are any and try again. If that doesn't work, the only thing to try is a different drive. Preferably not an LG model. I use ASUS's BD internal drive in a VanTech USB 3.0 enclosure, but I've not tested any DL BD discs in it. If you're going to use your own external enclosure with a BD drive, you will need a USB 3.x enclosure; 2.x won't do. ASUS makes an external BD drive, but I've yet to test it. I intend on getting one probably in December, but I don't have any BD-R DL to test it with. I've never even burned a BD-R DL before, only BD-RE DL.
  7. This isn't really a bug, per se. More like a request to adjust disc type determination logic. Here's the scenario: I was trying to create a DVD Video disc with a VIDEO_TS in the root directory. The root directory also had an AVI file in it. ImgBurn detected the VIDEO_TS folder and then asked me if I wanted to make a DVD Video disc, which I said yes to. ImgBurn THEN detected the AVI file and asked me if I wanted to make a Divx Disc. I said no to that. Should the ImgBurn logic in this case determine if the user makes one choice, like in the above situation, it should refrain from asking to change the disc type again? Thanks!
  8. Now, I've never copied a DVD Audio disc as I've never bought one, only created them myself, so I don't know if they're copy protected. Same for Bu-Ray Audio, which I didn't even know existed. I don't know if those are copy protected or not or if they can be. If they are, then we can't help you copy copy protected discs.
  9. All disc copies are made the same if you use the Read and Write modes of ImgBurn. There are a few guides that you may find worth going over to answer your questions: Concentrate primarily on the first Guide listed as that should cover almost everything.
  10. Under the Information tab in Build mode, is the Auto box checked or unchecked? If it's unchecked, try checking it.
  11. Had another oddity. Just burned a DVD+R DL that passed Write and Verify. Then, I went to Read the same disc I had just finished Writing and Verifying and the read rate plummeted to 0.01x at the layer change. I powered off the drive, powered it back on, and tried again. The 2nd attempt to Read the disc afterwards succeeded.
  12. Had another oddity. Just burned a DVD+R DL that passed Write and Verify. Then, I went to Read the same disc I had just finished Writing and Verifying and the read rate plummeted to 0.01x at the layer change. I powered off the drive, powered it back on, and tried again. The 2nd attempt to Read the disc afterwards succeeded.
  13. I do believe that first failed read was a fluke due to a behavioral "bug" either in the drive, Windows, or the OWC enclosure the drive is in. Unless you use the Eject context menu item to eject discs in File Explorer, the metadata of disc contents is NOT updated. The downside of this is if you don't do it, when you copy the contents of one disc in File Explorer without Ejecting, File Explorer is trying to copy nonexistent data from subsequent discs inserted into the drive.
  14. I do believe that first failed read was a fluke due to a behavioral "bug" either in the drive, Windows, or the OWC enclosure the drive is in. Unless you use the Eject context menu item to eject discs in File Explorer, the metadata of disc contents is NOT updated. The downside of this is if you don't do it, when you copy the contents of one disc in File Explorer without Ejecting, File Explorer is trying to copy nonexistent data from subsequent discs inserted into the drive.
  15. Interesting how that drive apparently supports DVD-RW DL reading and writing since DVD-RW DL was NEVER manufactured.
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