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dbminter

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  1. Well, the ASUS BD burners may be an option if you never intend to burn DVD+R DL. I never got beyond testing the last ASUS BD burner I got for testing a few months ago after it failed to properly write to DVD+R DL. BD-R was fine, but I only ever got around to testing DVD+RW, DVD-R, DVD+R DL, and BD-R. And the DVD+RW, while the ASUS drive had moved beyond the catastrophic failure of DESTROYING DVD+RW it used to do, I hadn't thoroughly tested the DVD+RW burn results. Initial indications were it didn't write correctly as they had playback problems on the PS3. But, I never got around to thoroughly vetting them yet when the catastrophic failure on DVD+R DL was a deal killer. I told ASUS, but, of course, they don't listen.
  2. Beyond the DVD+RW issue on the Pioneer 212 I last had, like I said, it died before 2 months had passed. It stopped writing BD-R. In the US, the NS60 could be found on Amazon.com and NewEgg. That's where I've gotten mine before.
  3. Yes, things really did go downhill that fast for Pioneer. The DVD+RW thing has been there probably longer than that, which was what initially drove me away from Pioneer. One firmware update fixed the problem, but all future firmware updates regressed the issue back in. About a year or so ago, I tried Pioneer again, since they had a new hardware model. Thought I'd hope against hope that they'd fixed their issues. Turns out, it was actually worse. I think the only real difference between the LG BH and WH models is a case similar to the Pioneers you linked. The WH16 simply replaced the BH models. Both support M-Disc, BD XL, and both appear to have the same maximum write speeds. The difference between the WH16NS40 and NS60 is the NS60 supports UHD. That's why the NS40 is cheaper, but I recommend the NS60 over the NS40 because the NS40 fails 9 times out of 10 to write BD-R/RE DL media. What country are you trying to find NS60's in?
  4. The only real "difference," most likely, is the S12XLT is the model that superceded the 212EBK. Meaning, it's replaced the other model, but the 212EBK stock is still available. Pioneer is known to do this: replace older models with newer ones that do the same thing while still offering stock of the older model. However, I would recommend you forego any Pioneer BD burners. Pioneer used to make the best BD burners out there. Had one that lasted for 2 and a half years before it needed replacing, unparalleled in a world where, normally, optical drives need replacing every 7 months, on average. Over the years, though, their quality has really turned into . I recently tried a 212 that Pioneer had to ultimately refund my money on. It died before 2 months! Plus, for years, the Pioneer BD firmware does not properly write to Ritek 8x DVD+RW and Pioneer refuses to do anything about it! There are basically 3 manufacturers to choose from for BD burners: Pioneer, LG, and ASUS. The one with the FEWEST issues is LG, IF you get the RIGHT LG BD burner. The WH16NS60 is my recommendation. It has no deal killers, just a few execution choices that make it a slower read and writer, in some cases, than the Pioneer. However, slower reads and writes are better than catastrophic failures, which are in the Pioneer and ASUS models. You may be tempted to get LG's WH16NS40 since it's cheaper. If you don't plan on writing BD DL media, which the NS40 says it supports but does not properly write to, you can get that. The NS60 supports the M-Disc you're looking for, and I think the NS40 did, too.
  5. If you have a preexisting image set that ImgBurn has already created, you can create an MDS file with the Create MDS File option under Tools. To always have ImgBurn create an MDS file whenever it creates an image, under Tools --> Settings, set the following: Build --> Page 1 --> Create Image File Layout --> Choose either Auto or Yes --> Image Layout File Format --> Check the MDS box --> OK
  6. What it sounds like you want is some kind of Blu-Ray authoring program. Since you specifically mention .SRT files, it sounds like you have some kind of downloaded video file with a separate subtitles .SRT file for it. Unless the Blu-Ray player you intend on using this video file on specifically reads .SRT files for containers, burning the .SRT file anywhere on the disc won't cause the subtitles to appear. You'd need to use some kind of Blu-Ray or DVD authoring program to combine the .SRT into the new video container. I use ConvertXToDVD for DVD authoring, which does support adding .SRT files to output, but 1.) it's paid software and 2.) you may not want to convert to DVD but to Blu-Ray or to another container file. The same company does offer similar software to make Blu-Ray video, though.
  7. I'd blame your drive. It's a slim model one, and most slim models are junk. The only slim model I've ever seen that was near usable was LG's BU40N that came in my Dell XPS 8930 desktop. And there's a "Verbatim" model I have from Office Depot, but I don't know who actually made that. It is a slim USB model that I use entirely for reading, but I've rarely, if ever, tested its write capabilities because I never had a reason to use anything but a half height burner because of all the horror stories I've heard of writing discs with slim model burners. I'd first try replacing your drive with something else. Preferably an external model that is not a slim, aka a half height model, as that would be easiest to install. What I use is the LG WH16NS60 in a Vantech USB 3.0 enclosure. However, you may not need a Blu-Ray burner. If you do get the NS60, be sure to get a USB 3.0 enclosure as 2.x won't be fast enough for a BD burner.
  8. If it's an internal drive, the age of the PC doesn't factor into when an optical drive will die off. Optical drives, internal or otherwise, have an average time before failure of about 7 months.
  9. We'll need the entire log for this failed burn. One thing that sticks out is what the drive is apparently returning in terms of error information. It seems it's returning a range of sectors starting with sector # -22 through sector # -1.
  10. Semaphore time out errors are generally caused by a conflict between the USB bridge in the external enclosure and the USB controller on your motherboard. First thing to rule out, make sure you're connecting the USB BD burner by USB 3.x instead of USB 2.x. USB 2.x is generally too slow to support BD burning and could be the cause of such an error in this case. Second, you say it only occurs on BD DL discs. What about regular BD SL discs? If it's one and not the other, it could be the manufacturer of that BD DL disc is not properly supported in the BD burner's firmware. Third, you're using the BW 16D1HT, which I consider junk. That drive has never worked right from its inception. Upon release, the original firmware DESTROYED DVD+RW and BD-RE on attempts to write to it. After 2 or 3 years, firmware updates fixed this issue, but did NOT fix the inability to properly write DVD+R DL's correctly without failing. So, I returned the last 16D1HT I got after I tried it again to see if firmware updates had fixed the issues I'd found before. It fixed the DVD+RW and BD-RE issues, but I then discovered it cannot write to DVD+R DL. I'd recommend you swap out that drive and get an LG WH16NS60 and a Vantech USB 3.0 enclosure. I've used those for years. DON'T get the WH16NS40 to save money because it doesn't have UHD BD on it. The NS40 does NOT properly write to BD DL media. It will fail 9 times out of 10.
  11. Is this drive connected internally or in a USB enclosure?
  12. Um, if I'm understanding what the question may be here, you're asking does ImgBurn return things like CRC errors if it cannot read data from bad sectors on a source device? ImgBurn should return an error that it cannot read the source file if the source file is on a bad sector on the source device. You should generally get a Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) error.
  13. Is it required or optional for BD-R? I saw it on my most recent BD-R burn and it made me curious as to what exactly it did.
  14. What exactly does Reserving Track do? Other than reserve track, obviously. I guess the better question is why is it necessary to reserve the track? Thanks!
  15. Some people do have compatibility problems with Ritek discs on their devices. They're not as bad as CMC, though, so that isn't as bad a concern here. If you were able to copy the contents successfully from the burned disc and some of those files opened correctly, a successful Read of this disc to a new image file should be a good indication that the disc is okay. Not 100% guaranteed, though.
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