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New instructions to burn BluRay folders with v2.5.0.0?

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I'm a brand new user of ImgBurn. I tried following the instructions for burning "BDMV" & "CERTIFICATES" folders from hard disk given here: Burning a Blu-ray Video disc using ImgBurn, but that doesn't quite match up with v2.5.0.0.

 

For example, the instruction guide at that link does not include the "Image Option" of "Data Type", which v2.5.0.0 lists as a choice between "MODE1/2048" and "MODE2/FORM1/2352" for the "UDF" File System. Also, the new version provides a new "UDF Revision" of "2.60".

 

Not knowing which of these settings I should use to write the two BluRay folders in question to a 50GB BD-RE blank disc, I guessed based on the guide linked to above, but the burn failed after ImgBurn reported that the disc wasn't large enough to hold the data in question. The two folders combined add up to 45.2 GB (sorry, I lost the log and I don't want to waste another 4 hours recreating it just for the log). So I figure I guessed wrong on the settings, most probably by choosing "MODE1/2048" rather than "MODE2/FORM1/2352".

 

So: What settings should I use to write those two BluRay folders to a 50GB BD-RE blank disc? What other instructions should I follow? For example, should I choose "UDF Revision" 2.60 or not?

 

And speaking of taking 4 hours, why should that be? The content in question is a bit over 2 hours, and the new Pioneer BDR-205 BluRay burner advertises its BD-RE burn speed as 2x. Shouldn't that mean it should only take 1 hour or so to burn? I have an extremely fast system, and the source folders are not significantly fragmented and they're on directly connected SATA-II hard disk (as opposed to being connected externally). What's wrong with my thinking there?

 

 

Thanks!

Edited by YouZer

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UDF 2.60 has been in there since the same day 2.50 was added.

 

Mode 2 only applies to CD.

 

If you'd selected Mode 2 the program would have prompted you to change it to Mode 1. It doesn't let you do anything too stupid, don't worry :)

 

As for taking 4 hours, the could be due to it burning at sub 1x speeds. That can happen on BD-RE media when it has been formatted with spare areas (for defect management). The drive will verify every sector it writes as it goes along, thus your 2x top speed becomes 0.9x or something.

 

The logs are saved automatically when you close ImgBurn down, just find them via the 'Help' menu in the program.

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Wow, I never expected a reply by the Maestro himself! You've developed an astonishingly fine product with ImgBurn, and you have my sincere gratitude for making it available without purchase (and you can expect a donation soon as well). I really enjoy the witty comments your proggie produces, too.

 

Anyway, thanks for the reply. Having read it, I have one last question: You speak of defect management, and I know just what that is. But how do I deal with this issue? Should I erase the blank re-writable BD-RE disc in some special manner, such as with your program? I think I erased it before hand using Nero 9. And should I use the quick erase (which I've always done) or the full erase in regards to defect management and avoiding slow burns?

 

Or are we talking about a situation in which the burn process encounters a bad sector while actually writing to the disc and then must resort to writing the data to an alternate sector in the spare area? In which case is the fundamental problem is that the media quality isn't as good as it should be? These are labeled Sony and say Ver. 2.1 / 2x.

 

Cuz' I mean, four hours! I chose mostly BD-RE discs because I don't want to have to buy a 50GB BD-R for every BluRay title I have because that would be more expensive in the end than re-using a few BD-RE's...

 

 

Forgot to add that as far as the over-long burn report from trying to write BluRay folders when I tried direct to disc writing, after reading your reply I tried creating an ISO image instead using Mode 1 and UDF 2.60 and that worked exactly as expected and hoped. The thing is, there are times when I won't want to do a two-step process wherein I'd create an ISO first and then burn it to disc. With that in mind, do you figger' my problem was probably pilot error? I can try it again when I have a spare four hours to kill!

 

 

Thanks

Edited by YouZer

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... Cuz' I mean, four hours! ...

Oops. Pilot error is the most likely diagnosis, as I'm a newbie and stupidly failed to recognize the significance of the SPTD warning. :blush: But I was a good lad who looked it up himself and uninstalled it without bugging you! Do I regain any points for that?

 

I'll try burning again and report back on the speed issue...

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Yes, you'll have to reformat the disc (full erase) with spare areas disabled (as is default in ImgBurn) in order for the drive to then stop doing the automatic write/verify.

 

Yes, defect management deals with bad sectors during the actual burn process and remaps them to a different area on the disc.

 

There are various options in the Settings to control how ImgBurn formats discs.

 

There is no difference in ImgBurn between making the ISO and burning it or just burning on the fly. The exact same code is used for the actual burning for each of the methods.

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Okay, I used ImgBurn to erase the disk (quick). I just read your reply above and now I know to do a full erase next time.

 

Since you note that there's no significantly different execution path between ISO and direct to disc writing, I'll try burning the BluRay folders to disc again later and see if I get the same results. Pilot error and all that.

 

Here's the log for my most recent speed test for writing an image file:

 

I 02:19:37 ImgBurn Version 2.5.0.0 started!

I 02:19:37 Microsoft Windows XP Professional (5.1, Build 2600 : Service Pack 3)

I 02:19:37 Total Physical Memory: 3,144,596 KB - Available: 2,285,212 KB

I 02:19:37 Initialising SPTI...

I 02:19:37 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices...

I 02:19:38 Found 1 DVD±RW/RAM, 1 BD-ROM/HD DVD-ROM and 1 BD-RE!

I 02:20:39 Operation Started!

I 02:20:39 Source File: W:\0_BLU-RAY\Title 1 ISO.dvd

I 02:20:39 Source File Sectors: 20,853,536 (MODE1/2048)

I 02:20:39 Source File Size: 42,708,041,728 bytes

I 02:20:39 Source File Volume Identifier: TITLE_01

I 02:20:39 Source File Volume Set Identifier: 8CB5374C749B1587_VOLUME_SET_ID

I 02:20:39 Source File Application Identifier: APPLICATION_ID

I 02:20:39 Source File Implementation Identifier: IMPLEMENTATION_ID

I 02:20:39 Source File File System(s): UDF (2.50)

I 02:20:39 Destination Device: [2:0:0] PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205 1.03 (P:) (ATA)

I 02:20:39 Destination Media Type: BD-RE (Disc ID: MEI-T01-01) (Speeds: 2x)

I 02:20:39 Destination Media Sectors: 23,652,352

I 02:20:39 Write Mode: BD

I 02:20:39 Write Type: DAO

I 02:20:39 Write Speed: MAX

I 02:20:39 BD-RE FastWrite: No

I 02:20:39 Link Size: Auto

I 02:20:39 Lock Volume: Yes

I 02:20:39 Test Mode: No

I 02:20:39 OPC: No

I 02:20:39 BURN-Proof: Enabled

I 02:20:39 Advanced Settings - Optimal Writing Speed: No

I 02:20:39 Filling Buffer... (40 MB)

I 02:20:40 Writing LeadIn...

I 02:20:40 Writing Session 1 of 1... (1 Track, LBA: 0 - 20853535)

I 02:20:40 Writing Track 1 of 1... (MODE1/2048, LBA: 0 - 20853535)

I 05:29:53 Synchronising Cache...

I 05:29:54 Exporting Graph Data...

I 05:29:54 Graph Data File: C:\Documents and Settings\YouZer\Application Data\ImgBurn\Graph Data Files\PIONEER_BD-RW_BDR-205_1.03_TUESDAY-DECEMBER-08-2009_2-20_AM_MEI-T01-01_MAX.ibg

I 05:29:54 Export Successfully Completed!

I 05:29:54 Operation Successfully Completed! -
Duration: 03:09:15

I 05:29:54 Average Write Rate: 3,673 KB/s (0.8x) - Maximum Write Rate: 4,174 KB/s (0.9x)

 

The blue text tells the tale. Is that normal? I know now that I need to do a full ImgBurn erase with the default settings first next time. But as for the messages in blue, is there anything I can do to avoid those messages and increase the speed significantly? A few minutes less wouldn't be very helpful...

 

Thanks again for your valuable time and assistance.

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Enabling BD-RE FastWrite increases the write speed by setting the Streaming flag, which then makes the drive not to check the data while burning, but this is just a "quick and dirty" method since the disc will still have spare areas.

 

By formatting with spare areas disabled the drive won't check the data while burning, regardless of the FastWrite setting, and you'll also gain a few extra megabytes of space, which were being used as spare areas for defect management.

 

Optimal Writing Speed is a feature of newer Pioneer burner where it slows down the burn speed if it detects the burn quality isn't good.

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fyi, a quick erase does nothing more than write zeroes to the first 800 sectors - thus blanking out the file system descriptors.

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I 05:29:54 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 03:09:15

I 05:29:54 Average Write Rate: 3,673 KB/s (0.8x) - Maximum Write Rate: 4,174 KB/s (0.9x)[/indent]

 

The blue text tells the tale. Is that normal?

I believe the simple answer is: YES, that's normal. 43Gb is an awful lot of data. I can do a 8.5Gb file in 45mins, and yours is 5x that big.

 

These monster discs require that we re-set our expectations.

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It would be more like 1hr 30 with spare areas disabled (where it would then burn at 2.0x and not 0.8x). That of course means a SL BD would take 45 mins at 2x. Some drives can now do 10x on BD-R SL which makes it pretty quick for 25GB!

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It would be more like 1hr 30 with spare areas disabled (where it would then burn at 2.0x and not 0.8x). That of course means a SL BD would take 45 mins at 2x. Some drives can now do 10x on BD-R SL which makes it pretty quick for 25GB!

Ok I guess the "x-multiplier" (datarate) between DVD and BD is different, as it is for CD-to-DVD. Thanks for straightening me out... :blush:

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Enabling BD-RE FastWrite increases the write speed by setting the Streaming flag, which then makes the drive not to check the data while burning, but this is just a "quick and dirty" method since the disc will still have spare areas.

 

By formatting with spare areas disabled the drive won't check the data while burning, regardless of the FastWrite setting, and you'll also gain a few extra megabytes of space, which were being used as spare areas for defect management.

 

Optimal Writing Speed is a feature of newer Pioneer burner where it slows down the burn speed if it detects the burn quality isn't good.

Thanks for the very helpful info, mmalves. Would you checking my thinking on the following, please? It seems then that after doing a full erase with spare areas disabled, I would want to enable "Optimal Writing Speed" for the Pioneer so that the burn isn't always written at max speed if that would mean the end burn would be bad? And also that I'd get a little speed improvement if I enabled FastWrite as well?

 

In other words, do you think I should invert the settings for those two features to: "Optimal Writing Speed" = Enabled, and "FastWrite" enabled as well in order to get the fastest burn while still getting a good burn?

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I 05:29:54 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 03:09:15

I 05:29:54 Average Write Rate: 3,673 KB/s (0.8x) - Maximum Write Rate: 4,174 KB/s (0.9x)[/indent]

 

The blue text tells the tale. Is that normal?

I believe the simple answer is: YES, that's normal. 43Gb is an awful lot of data. I can do a 8.5Gb file in 45mins, and yours is 5x that big.

 

These monster discs require that we re-set our expectations.

I see what you posted later, but I just wanted to note here that on my systems I can burn a 8.5 GB dual-layer DVD in about 11 minutes (that's on other burners rather than the Pioneer, but I think the Pioneer might even be able to do it faster, though I haven't tried that yet). 45 minutes for the same thing sounds awfully slow to me...

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It would be more like 1hr 30 with spare areas disabled (where it would then burn at 2.0x and not 0.8x). That of course means a SL BD would take 45 mins at 2x. Some drives can now do 10x on BD-R SL which makes it pretty quick for 25GB!

10x is quite impressive, but this new Pioneer BDR-205 I own writes BD-R at 12x. That's the main reason I bought it. Although I've been discussing BD-RE media in these posts, I have several 50GB dual layer BD-R blank discs as well.

 

By the way, there's one question I forgot to ask: Performing a full erase with spare areas disabled took nearly 1.5 hours. If I had to do that every time before I overwrite a BD-RE disc, the total time to burn would be much longer than it took to re-burn after a quick erase. So the question is: Would I have to do a full erase every time, or from now on can I perform a quick erase? I assume that's true since I doubt you would have suggested it otherwise...

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New problem: None of the Dual Layer BD-RE discs I've burned with ImgBurn with play on any of my computers or on any of my standalone BluRay players.

 

I'm sure this is yet another case of pilot error (or should I say "YouZer Error"), so I'd appreciate help in figuring out what I'm doing wrong.

 

When I burned the BluRay ISOs in question on the very same BD-RE discs using Nero 9's Nero Burning Rom, they played fine on my computers as well as on my standalone players (and I chose physical BD-RE discs in the first place so that I can play them on those standalone players). Note that the ones that played were quick formatted by Nero first (and so I assume the spare areas were enabled) as well as burned with Nero.

 

All discs were burned using the Pioneer burner referenced in this thread, and all of those I burned with ImgBurn reported complete success. One burn was reported in the log above, and note that spare areas were enabled as well as the settings reported in that log. Here's the most recent ImgBurn log for the second title:

 

I 00:21:48 ImgBurn Version 2.5.0.0 started!

I 00:21:48 Microsoft Windows XP Professional (5.1, Build 2600 : Service Pack 3)

I 00:21:48 Total Physical Memory: 3,144,596 KB - Available: 2,370,928 KB

I 00:21:48 Initialising SPTI...

I 00:21:48 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices...

I 00:21:49 Found 1 DVD±RW/RAM, 1 BD-ROM/HD DVD-ROM and 1 BD-RE!

I 00:31:31 Operation Started!

I 00:31:31 Source File: W:\0_BLU-RAY\Title 2.dvd

I 00:31:31 Source File Sectors: 20,853,536 (MODE1/2048)

I 00:31:31 Source File Size: 42,708,041,728 bytes

I 00:31:31 Source File Volume Identifier: TITLE 2

I 00:31:31 Source File Volume Set Identifier: 8CB5374C749B1587_VOLUME_SET_ID

I 00:31:31 Source File Application Identifier: APPLICATION_ID

I 00:31:31 Source File Implementation Identifier: IMPLEMENTATION_ID

I 00:31:31 Source File File System(s): UDF (2.50)

I 00:31:31 Destination Device: [2:0:0] PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205 1.03 (P:) (ATA)

I 00:31:31 Destination Media Type: BD-RE (Disc ID: MEI-T01-01) (Speeds: 2x)

I 00:31:31 Destination Media Sectors: 24,438,784

I 00:31:31 Write Mode: BD

I 00:31:31 Write Type: DAO

I 00:31:31 Write Speed: MAX

I 00:31:31 BD-RE FastWrite: Yes

I 00:31:31 Link Size: Auto

I 00:31:31 Lock Volume: Yes

I 00:31:31 Test Mode: No

I 00:31:31 OPC: No

I 00:31:31 BURN-Proof: Enabled

I 00:31:31 Advanced Settings - Optimal Writing Speed: No

I 00:31:31 Filling Buffer... (40 MB)

I 00:31:32 Writing LeadIn...

I 00:31:44 Writing Session 1 of 1... (1 Track, LBA: 0 - 20853535)

I 00:31:44 Writing Track 1 of 1... (MODE1/2048, LBA: 0 - 20853535)

I 01:51:26 Synchronising Cache...

I 01:51:27 Exporting Graph Data...

I 01:51:27 Graph Data File: C:\Documents and Settings\YouZer\Application Data\ImgBurn\Graph Data Files\PIONEER_BD-RW_BDR-205_1.03_WEDNESDAY-DECEMBER-09-2009_12-31_AM_MEI-T01-01_MAX.ibg

I 01:51:27 Export Successfully Completed!

I 01:51:27 Operation Successfully Completed! - Duration: 01:19:55

I 01:51:27 Average Write Rate: 8,723 KB/s (1.9x) - Maximum Write Rate: 9,133 KB/s (2.0x)

 

The symptoms I saw on both my standalone players were identical. Both discs/titles were recognized as BD-ROM discs and loaded without error. Disc 1/Title 1 played the previews fine, but when it got to the main title, nothing played at all (and no error messages came up). Nothing played at all on Disc2/Title 2, not even the previews.

 

On my computers using WinDVD Pro 2010, like the players, XP showed their volume names correctly and WinDVD recognized them as BD-ROM discs, but it could not play anything on either discs.

 

The two different standalone BluRay players - a Sony BDP-S300 and a Sharp BD-HP21U -- each has the latest firmware installed (I updated them both to the latest versions just 2 days ago). And they're connected to two different 1080p high-def TVs as well, so the TV is not the problem either.

 

Since my guess is that the first log (post #6) would match Nero 9's settings (I changed nothing from the defaults) and that played fine and that neither ImgBurn disc played on either player, I would assume that Nero used different settings than what's reported in that log. The only other thing that I can think of is that Nero used UDF 2.60 while I left ImgBurn's default of UDF 2.50 stand.

 

So what am I doing wrong now?

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Once you've formatted the BD-RE with spare areas disabled, you don't need to ever format it again. It's a one time only thing - assuming no other program formats it again and turns them back on.

 

Once disabled, you do not and should not enable 'FastWrite'. It's pointless.

 

There are options you can change in the settings to speed up the formatting - by basically telling it to not do it properly ('properly' being where it has the drive certify the media as part of the format and optionally writes zeroes to all the sectors once the drive has done its thing).

 

You may find that yours players *only* work with BD-RE discs where spare areas are enabled, I don't know.

 

WinDVD should be able to play your disc regardless so it looks more like a content issue to me.

 

Try mounting the ISO in Virtual CloneDrive (use the latest beta version) and see if it can play it from there.

 

UDF 2.50 is the standard on Blu-ray discs.

 

It wouldn't hurt to verify your burns to make sure they're 100% readable, at least in the Pioneer.

 

The 'Advanced Settings - Optimal Writing Speed: No' thing is a Pioneer gimmick, just ignore it and leave it turned off.

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By the way, there's one question I forgot to ask: Performing a full erase with spare areas disabled took nearly 1.5 hours. If I had to do that every time before I overwrite a BD-RE disc, the total time to burn would be much longer than it took to re-burn after a quick erase. So the question is: Would I have to do a full erase every time, or from now on can I perform a quick erase? I assume that's true since I doubt you would have suggested it otherwise...

You don't need to quick erase BD-RE media, just overwrite it: when you click the Write/Build button ImgBurn will ask you if you want to overwrite the disc then you say Yes. It's as simple as that :)

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Once you've formatted the BD-RE with spare areas disabled, you don't need to ever format it again. It's a one time only thing - assuming no other program formats it again and turns them back on.

 

Once disabled, you do not and should not enable 'FastWrite'. It's pointless.

 

There are options you can change in the settings to speed up the formatting - by basically telling it to not do it properly ('properly' being where it has the drive certify the media as part of the format and optionally writes zeroes to all the sectors once the drive has done its thing).

 

You may find that yours players *only* work with BD-RE discs where spare areas are enabled, I don't know.

 

WinDVD should be able to play your disc regardless so it looks more like a content issue to me.

 

Try mounting the ISO in Virtual CloneDrive (use the latest beta version) and see if it can play it from there.

 

UDF 2.50 is the standard on Blu-ray discs.

 

It wouldn't hurt to verify your burns to make sure they're 100% readable, at least in the Pioneer.

 

The 'Advanced Settings - Optimal Writing Speed: No' thing is a Pioneer gimmick, just ignore it and leave it turned off.

Thanks again, LIGHTNING UK! Lots of good info there.

 

First, a correction and some clarifications:

 

(1): Disc 1/Title 1 as burned by ImgBurn did end up playing on WinDVD 2010 Pro; I just had to launch AnyDVD HD to work around the fact that the computer I played it on had previously been deemed incompatible with the DRM technology whatsit (I can't recall the acronym, but I think it has 4 letters).

 

(2): Disc 2/Title 2 as burned by ImgBurn did not play on WinDVD 2010 Pro, even with AnyDVD HD enabled. Note that both burned successfully (but I did not verify the burns).

 

(3): Since, as described above, the discs burned with Nero 9 played fine everywhere (though those discs had the spare areas enabled), I tried Nero 9 again and just overwrote (as you and mmalves kindly advised me) them. Since the discs had previously been full erased with ImgBurn's option to disable spare areas, I thought this would be a good test to determine if there was something different between Nero 9 and ImgBurn's burning process, since spare areas might well be required (as you suggested might be the case in your reply) for standalone players. I also chose to verify the burns as you also suggested.

 

The result was a bit unexpected. The first new Nero 9 burn was to a disc that definitely did not have spare areas. It was burned at 2x after Nero did it's Max Speed Test. The burn failed, curiously enough, as a result of a hardware error (or so Nero reported it). Here's the Nero log (I hope it's not blasphemous to post it!):

 

Windows XP 5.1

IA32

WinAspi: -

 

NT-SPTI used

Nero Version: 9.4.13.100

Internal Version: 9, 4, 13, 100

 

Recorder: <PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205> Version: 1.03 - HA 1 TA 1 - 9.4.13.100

Adapter driver: <Serial ATA> HA 1

Drive buffer : 4000kB

Bus Type : via Inquiry data

Connected to MMC as unknown drive with class-nr : 1

Drive is autodetected - recorder class: Std. MMC recorder

CD-ROM: <ELBY CLONEDRIVE >Version: 1.4 - HA 1 TA 2 - 9.4.13.100

Adapter driver: <SCSI> HA 1

 

=== Scsi-Device-Map ===

CdRomPeripheral : ATAPI DVD A DH20A4H atapi Port 0 ID 0 DMA: On

DiskPeripheral : ST3750640AS atapi Port 1 ID 0 DMA: On

CdRomPeripheral : PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205 atapi Port 2 ID 0 DMA: On

DiskPeripheral : ST31500341AS atapi Port 2 ID 1 DMA: On

DiskPeripheral : MARVELL Raid VD 0 mv61xx Port 5 ID 0 DMA: Off

DiskPeripheral : Seagate ST31500341AS CC1H mv61xx Port 5 ID 1 DMA: Off

ArrayPeripheral : MARVELL Virtual Device 1.00 mv61xx Port 5 ID 25 DMA: Off

DiskPeripheral : ADAPTEC RAID 0 1.0 a320raid Port 6 ID 0 DMA: Off

OtherPeripheral : ADAPTEC HostRAID 1.0 a320raid Port 6 ID 15 DMA: Off

CdRomPeripheral : ELBY CLONEDRIVE 1.4 VClone Port 8 ID 0 DMA: Off

 

=== CDRom-Device-Map ===

ATAPI DVD A DH20A4H R: CdRom0

PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205 P: CdRom1

ELBY CLONEDRIVE Q: CdRom2

=======================

 

AutoRun : 1

Excluded drive IDs:

WriteBufferSize: 83886080 (0) Byte

BUFE : 0

Physical memory : 2047MB (2097151kB)

Free physical memory: 2047MB (2097151kB)

Memory in use : 22 %

Uncached PFiles: 0x0

Global Bus Type: default (0)

Check supported media : Disabled (0)

 

9.12.2009

Burn BD Image

9:59:51 AM #1 Text 0 File SCSIPTICommands.cpp, Line 430

LockMCN - completed sucessfully for IOCTL_STORAGE_MCN_CONTROL

 

9:59:52 AM #2 Text 0 File Burncd.cpp, Line 3572

Turn on Disc-At-Once, using Blu-ray Disc media

 

9:59:58 AM #3 Text 0 File DlgWaitCD.cpp, Line 313

Last possible write address on media: 24438783

Last address to be written: 20853535

 

9:59:58 AM #4 Text 0 File DlgWaitCD.cpp, Line 325

Write in overburning mode: NO (enabled: CD)

 

9:59:58 AM #5 Text 0 File DlgWaitCD.cpp, Line 2843

Recorder: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205, Media type: BD-RE

 

9:59:58 AM #6 Text 0 File DlgWaitCD.cpp, Line 500

>>> Protocol of DlgWaitCD activities: <<<

=========================================

Insert empty disc to write to.

(Medium in drive: BD-RE DL. Medium required by compilation: BD-R/RE, BD DL.)

This disc is not empty.

(Medium in drive: BD-RE DL. Medium required by compilation: BD-R/RE, BD DL.)

Accessing disc...

(Medium in drive: BD-RE DL. Medium required by compilation: BD-R/RE, BD DL.)

 

9:59:58 AM #7 Text 0 File ThreadedTransferInterface.cpp, Line 739

Setup items (after recorder preparation)

0: TRM_DATA_MODE1 (2 - CD-ROM Mode 1)

2 indices, index0 (150) not provided

original disc pos #0 + 20853536 (20853536) = #20853536/4634:7.11

not relocatable, disc pos for caching/writing not required/not required

-> TRM_DATA_MODE1, 2048, config 0, wanted index0 0 blocks, length 20853536 blocks [P: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205]

--------------------------------------------------------------

 

9:59:58 AM #8 Text 0 File ThreadedTransferInterface.cpp, Line 941

Prepare [P: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205] for write in CUE-sheet-DAO

DAO infos:

==========

MCN: ""

TOCType: 0x00; Session Closed, disc fixated

Tracks 1 to 1: Idx 0 Idx 1 Next Trk

1: TRM_DATA_MODE1, 2048/0x00, FilePos 0 0 42708041728, ISRC ""

DAO layout:

===========

___Start_|____Track_|_Idx_|_CtrlAdr_|_____Size_|______NWA_|_RecDep__________

0 | lead-in | 0 | 0x41 | 0 | 0 | 0x00

0 | 1 | 0 | 0x41 | 0 | 0 | 0x00

0 | 1 | 1 | 0x41 | 20853536 | 20853536 | 0x00

20853536 | lead-out | 1 | 0x41 | 0 | 0 | 0x00

 

9:59:59 AM #9 Text 0 File SCSIPTICommands.cpp, Line 217

SPTILockVolume - completed successfully for FSCTL_LOCK_VOLUME

 

9:59:59 AM #10 Text 0 File Burncd.cpp, Line 4279

Caching options: cache CDRom or Network-Yes, small files-No (<64KB)

 

9:59:59 AM #11 Phase 24 File dlgbrnst.cpp, Line 1767

Caching of files started

 

9:59:59 AM #12 Text 0 File Burncd.cpp, Line 4401

Cache writing successful.

 

9:59:59 AM #13 Phase 25 File dlgbrnst.cpp, Line 1767

Caching of files completed

 

9:59:59 AM #14 Phase 28 File dlgbrnst.cpp, Line 1767

Speed measurement started

 

9:59:59 AM #15 Text 0 File ThreadedTransferInterface.cpp, Line 2695

Verifying disc position of item 0 (not relocatable, no disc pos, no patch infos, orig at #0): write at #0

 

9:59:59 AM #16 Text 0 File ThreadedTransfer.cpp, Line 273

Pipe memory size 590400

 

10:09:02 AM #17 Text 0 File WriterStatus.cpp, Line 245

<P: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205> start writing Lead-Out at LBA 20853536 (13E3320h), length 0 blocks

 

10:09:02 AM #18 Phase 29 File dlgbrnst.cpp, Line 1716

Speed measurement completed: 17x (76,726 KB/s)

 

10:09:02 AM #19 Phase 36 File dlgbrnst.cpp, Line 1767

Burn process started at 2x (8,990 KB/s)

 

10:09:02 AM #20 Text 0 File ThreadedTransferInterface.cpp, Line 2695

Verifying disc position of item 0 (not relocatable, no disc pos, no patch infos, orig at #0): write at #0

 

10:09:03 AM #21 Text 0 File Cdrdrv.cpp, Line 10168

---- Disc Structure (BD): Disc Information on BD (00h) ----

Media Type: 1, Layer: 0, Address: 0 (0 h), AGID: 0; Length: 4098

--- Header ---

Disc Information Identifier: <DI>

Disc Information Format: 01 h

Number of DI Units/Aux Frames in each DI block: 5

Number of (recording) layer to which this DI Unit applies: 0

DI unit Sequence Number in DI Block: 0

Continuation flag: Next DI Unit is the start of a new set of parameters (0)

Number of DI bytes in use in this DI unit: 99

--- Body ---

Disc Type Identifier: <BDW>

Disc Size/Class/Version: 2

DI Unit Format dependent contents:

BD Structure: 36 (24 h):

2 recording layer (DL), BD-RE

Hybrid Disc identifier/Channel bit length: 1 (1 h):

no DVD layer present, no CD layer present

channel bit length of 74,5 nm (25.0 GB max. per layer)

Push-Pull polarity flag bits: 00 h

BCA descriptor: BCA-code present (1)

Maximum transfer rat

 

10:09:03 AM #22 Text 0 File BD.cpp, Line 392

BD: Start write address at LBA 0, Recording mode: unknown Recording Mode (0),

spare area allocation: default (no action) (0), Stream recording: NO (0); return code 0

 

10:09:03 AM #23 Text 0 File ThreadedTransfer.cpp, Line 273

Pipe memory size 83836800

10:59:29 AM #24 SPTI -1061 File SCSIPassThrough.cpp, Line 215

CdRom1: SCSIStatus(x02) WinError(0) NeroError(-1061)

CDB Data: 0x2A 00 00 C8 41 20 00 00 20 00 00 00

Sense Key: 0x04 (KEY_HARDWARE_ERROR)

Sense Code: 0x44

Sense Qual: 0x00

Sense Area: 0x71 00 04 00 C8 3E 60 0E 00 00 00 00 44

Buffer x0e152280: Len x10000

0xE5 EC 08 FA 41 9D EE 1A BA AA A6 E7 25 E1 0D A2

0xE4 A5 19 CC CB 8B 4B B1 7F 18 03 91 DE 28 BB 7E

0xD7 D3 B1 EB 21 ED 31 6C F3 1B 7E 0C 0D 84 2B 6A

 

10:59:29 AM #25 CDR -1061 File Writer.cpp, Line 306

Internal target failure

P: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205

 

10:59:29 AM #26 Text 0 File DVDPlusDualLayer.cpp, Line 1452

SetDriveCaps: Set LAST LBA of layer 1 to 0

 

10:59:29 AM #27 Phase 38 File dlgbrnst.cpp, Line 1767

Burn process failed at 2x (8,990 KB/s)

 

10:59:29 AM #28 Text 0 File SCSIPTICommands.cpp, Line 267

SPTIDismountVolume - completed successfully for FSCTL_DISMOUNT_VOLUME

 

10:59:32 AM #29 Text 0 File Cdrdrv.cpp, Line 11478

DriveLocker: UnLockVolume completed

 

10:59:32 AM #30 Text 0 File SCSIPTICommands.cpp, Line 430

UnLockMCN - completed sucessfully for IOCTL_STORAGE_MCN_CONTROL

 

 

Existing drivers:

 

Registry Keys:

HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\WinLogon\AllocateCDROMs : (Security Option)

 

One thing that brought to mind is the list of Interfaces listed in ImgBurn's I/O settings tab, which lists:

ASPI - WINASPI32.DLL

ASAPI - ASAPI.DLL

SPTI - Microsoft <<--- Selected

ElbyCDIO - Elaborate Bytes

Patin-Couggin - VSO Software

 

Is SPTI the best choice?

 

In any case, the Nero burn failed. I guessed that this might have been because of the lack of spare areas (although it might also be related to too fast a burn speed, but since I let Nero determine the burn speed, I didn't think I should override it).

 

So my hypothesis was that if I did a full Nero erase, it would either give me the option of explicitly enabling spare areas again or it would do so as the default. Since it did not offer me the choice, I assumed it would re-establish the spare areas.

 

After the full erase, I tried to burn the same title on the same disc using Nero again. The burn failed again!

 

The logs were almost identical, so instead of posting the second Nero log in full, I'll just note the differences:

 

(A): The first burn log included the bit about the media not being empty. Since I'd done a full erase prior to the second attempt, the second log did not include that section.

 

(
B)
: Some of the hex data in the SPTI Error -1061 log was different, but all the error codes were the same in both logs.

 

Key question: Are there valid grounds to think that that -1061 error had anything to do with dirty media? I would think that would be the main reason to have spare areas; i.e., so that the burning software would more likely always have a clean place to burn data that didn't verify successfully in the original location. I'm always very careful with my media, but I would think that given the very high density of a dual-layer BD-RE disc, normal care might not be enough. After handling these discs even a few times, the write surface looks somehow dustier and less perfect than I would have expected. The thing is, I have no good idea what to do about this: I'm understandably very hesitant to clean them even with radial swipes (as opposed to circular ones), but I've tried carefully anyway. The discs look cleaner afterward, but perhaps they're not clean enough. Anyone know how this ultra-high-density re-writable media should be cleaned?

 

(4): You suggested I try loading the image files in VirtualCloneDrive and playing them on my computer. They all play perfectly that way, so it seems to me that the content isn't the issue and that the difference must lie in something related to burning physical discs from these BluRay image files or BluRay folders.

 

One thing to keep in mind is that when I first used ImgBurn, the BD-RE discs did have the spare areas, but unlike Nero 9 (which I used to burn them first), the ImgBurn discs never played in my standalone players (again, even though the spare areas were present).

 

Here's what I'm going to try now: I'm going to do a full erase using ImgBurn and explicitly re-enable the spare areas. Then I'm going to try Nero again. If that succeeds, I'm going to retry ImgBurn with the same disc (with the spare areas) and see what happens.

 

Final question for this post: Should I change the I/O tab's Interface settings? What other ImgBurn settings should I use for discs with spare areas? Is there any way to produce a more detailed log from ImgBurn, or is that unnecessary?

 

Many, many thanks to those who read through all that!

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10:59:29 AM #25 CDR -1061 File Writer.cpp, Line 306

Internal target failure

P: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205

 

The bit in bold is the error text you should be looking at. That's what all the other rubbish above it actually breaks down to.

 

If you've made an image of the disc and are simply burning that, there's no reason for it not to work equally as well as the 'mounted' image. They are identical. That is of course assuming the disc verifies ok.

 

Don't mess with any of ImgBurn's settings. No you don't need any more detail in the log, it tells you everything you (we) need to know - well, perhaps combined with the disc info text from the panel on the right but that's relevant on a case by case basis.

 

Yes, SPTI is the best choice, that's why it's the default.

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10:59:29 AM #25 CDR -1061 File Writer.cpp, Line 306

Internal target failure

P: PIONEER BD-RW BDR-205

 

The bit in bold is the error text you should be looking at. That's what all the other rubbish above it actually breaks down to.

 

If you've made an image of the disc and are simply burning that, there's no reason for it not to work equally as well as the 'mounted' image. They are identical. That is of course assuming the disc verifies ok.

 

Thanks, but perhaps you don't realize how unhelpful that is. May I ask you to help me understand what the "Internal target failure" error message is trying to tell me and what relevance that should have for future efforts? I know enough basic SCSI terminology to suspect that the term "target" is related to SCSI-talk, but why would that message appear and what do I need to do to avoid that? I see no persuasive argument to suspect an actual physical problem with the burner or the disc or a SCSI hardware issue.

 

You say "there's no reason for it not to work equally as well as the 'mounted' image", but the fact is, it doesn't. So clearly there's some reason for that. The mounted image files all play perfectly on my computers, but the fact of the matter is one of the two discs burned by ImgBurn wouldn't even play there. More to the point, I don't need ImgBurn to watch these titles on my computers. I need it for burning physical discs.

 

I asked other questions too. Nero 9 burned the very same image file to the very same BD-RE disc and it played perfectly on all my devices, including both standalone BluRay players. Yet when I burned it with ImgBurn, it would not play there, even though spare areas were present and enabled, which tells me there's a clearly relevant difference between Nero 9 and ImgBurn. I'd prefer using ImgBurn so that I have greater control over the burn speed and related settings, but if it's going to produce discs that won't play on my standalone players there's no value there. Surely there's more that needs elucidation on all of these points.

 

I read up on cleaning dual-layer BD-RE discs, and it turns out that these are considerably more resilient to scratches and the like than even high quality DVD discs are. The advice? Don't worry too much about those issues (if you feel it's necessary, use radial swipes, but even just spritzing them with a little water then rubbing them on your shirt is perfectly fine). Thus, the "target error" most likely had nothing to do with dirty media.

 

So what did cause it?

 

I just burned the very same image (Title 1) using Nero 9 on the same burner with a BD-R disc, and it again played perfectly on my standalone players. I'm going to burn that title again on the BD-RE discs I've used before using ImgBurn with verify. In the mean time, there's more than likely a real problem here, and I need significantly more assistance on this problem.

 

Thank you.

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All I/O errors are due to the drive/firmware/media combo. 'Internal Target Failure' means as much to me as it does to you - not a lot. Either way, the drive ran into an issue when trying to write to the disc and that's the error code it reported.

 

Ignoring all the other questions you've just asked, if you can burn an ISO (i.e. 'c:\bluray_image.iso') to a BD-RE in Nero and it plays on your player, you should be able to take the same ISO and burn it to the same BD-RE (overwriting what was there) and have it play on your player too. If it doesn't work like that then I give up.

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All I/O errors are due to the drive/firmware/media combo. 'Internal Target Failure' means as much to me as it does to you - not a lot. Either way, the drive ran into an issue when trying to write to the disc and that's the error code it reported.

 

Ignoring all the other questions you've just asked, if you can burn an ISO (i.e. 'c:\bluray_image.iso') to a BD-RE in Nero and it plays on your player, you should be able to take the same ISO and burn it to the same BD-RE (overwriting what was there) and have it play on your player too. If it doesn't work like that then I give up.

 

Okay, thanks again LIGHTNING UK!, for your patience with me as well as for your knowledge and assistance, and most of all, for your time. You sure come across as a good bloke, as I think you folks say (as a 'merican, I'm not supposed to know even that much about you furriners, but what the hell... ;)

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