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UDF iso


shojisuka
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Hard to tell what you're talking about here exactly...

 

ImgBurn can BURN/WRITE images of any size really - depending on the size of your blank media of course!

 

The next version of ImgBurn (version 2) can BUILD images from files on your hdd... yes it can do UDF only, and will allow you to create big images by splitting them (if needed) on FAT32 drives etc.

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Hi thanks for replying. I can't quite parse your sentence. Yes what i meant was if it can burn into a DVD, files larger than 2GB because supposedly iso9660 isn't specced for that. So do you mean that the current version of imgburn can burn single files larger than 2GB?

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Why would it be 2gb only?

 

As far as I can remember, you're allowed to use 32bits for the file size, meaning 4GB is the largest.

 

I certainly impose no 2GB limit.

 

Because it's 32bit signed integer. Any greater than 2GB would give a negative number. I would have thought that would be obvious to someone like you.

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Well yeah duh, it would be, but who says it's a 32bit signed integer?!

 

I can see no mention of that anywhere.

 

In fact, ECMA 119 specifically says the field, 9.1.4 - 'Data Length', is to be recorded according to 7.3.3 - 32bit numerical value.

 

7.3.3 - 32bit numerical value is defined as:

 

7.3.3 Both-byte orders

 

A numerical value represented by the hexadecimal representation (st uv wx yz) shall be recorded in an eight-byte

field as (yz wx uv st st uv wx yz).

NOTE 14

For example, the decimal number 305419896 has (12 34 56 78) as its hexadecimal representation and is

recorded as (78 56 34 12 12 34 56 78).

 

Only for an 8bit field does it mention the word 'signed' or 'unsigned' - and they're the only 2 mentions of 'signed' in the entire document.

 

So.... if you can tell me where you read it's a 32bit signed integer value (which, let's face it, would be pretty silly for a field they know would only hold a positive value!), I'd really like to see it for myself.

 

(EDIT: Also, WinRar, IsoBuster, Windows 95 and Windows XP can all read ISO's with files > 2GB within them and report the full size correctly.)

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if 4gb didn't work , why would a company as big as HP post a warning such as this??

 

 

 

NOTE: The limitation of 4GB for the size of a file is a limitation in the ISO9660 standard, therefore not a restriction imposed by HP-UX.

 

 

 

source: http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90970/ch08s04.html

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Thanks for reading around and clearing this up corn - nice to know that LUK! knows what he is talking about.....

 

 

 

lfc, Never any doubt mate................ :thumbup:

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i have just proven to myself that this works by making one big file over 2gb and converting it to iso

 

heres the file

 

post-8-1153939536_thumb.png

 

heres the log

 

I 20:47:22 Image Sectors: 1.545.112

I 20:47:22 Image Size: 3.164.389.376 bytes

I 20:47:22 Image Single Layer Profile: DVD-R/RW (Media Capacity: 2.298.496)

I 20:47:22 Image File System(s): ISO9660

I 20:47:22 Destination File: I:DVD ISO\vob iso.iso

 

and heres the greater than 2gb iso

 

post-8-1153940098_thumb.png

 

 

i hope this clears up any doubt

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Okay. I remember trying with both CDRWin and mkisofs to make an ISO with file over 2GB and failing. Most likely limitations of the software (all my stuff has the 2GB limit also because of VB6 limitation). Anyone know a free (preferably open source) ISO builder with > 2GB support?

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