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I don't understand this...


Movie Junkie
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The following is from a "News in Brief" article in the September 2006 "Windows XP: The Official Magazine" published by Future Publishing.

 

"Microsoft has stopped offering downloads of Windows Vista Beta 2 after huge interest has exhausted the company's supply in just three weeks."

 

How can the suppy be exhaused? It's just a file that is being downloaded. It doesn't matter if the file were downloaded one time, or one-trillion times. The original file would still be on their server, site or wherever the heck it is. I could understand if too much bandwidth is being used for the downloads but they're not saying that. :blink:

 

Am I missing something here?

Edited by Movie Junkie
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good sales hype, so when they come to actually sell it, its goin to cost a fortune as demand is so high we cant manufacture it fast enough

BUt we have opened up a dedicated manufacturing plant in the far east that will allow us to ship within a few days of your ordering :P

Sony take note :thumbup:

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good sales hype, so when they come to actually sell it, its goin to cost a fortune as demand is so high we cant manufacture it fast enough

BUt we have opened up a dedicated manufacturing plant in the far east that will allow us to ship within a few days of your ordering :P

Sony take note :thumbup:

:lol::lol:
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Most likely, they mean the supply of available beta testing slots. Because, you have to understand how commercial beta testing is done. The number of testers is always limited because they need the number of samples in the set controlled. If the number varies or is never capped, then, people who, basically, cannot be monitored, controlled, selected for specific traits, etc. are allowed into the sample set. In other words, a REAL world return of user experiences would occur, as opposed to the ones the commercial software developer wants. ;)

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Well, it depends. There are basically 3 modes, apparently. 1.) if you're willing to pay for everything 2.) IF your hardware supports it and you have qualified #1 3.) a mode sans 1 and 2.

 

 

It appears to be like 1 GB of RAM... and the will of God to get it to work. =))

 

 

Posted before I was done. :lol: I had meant to go on at the above point by saying that depending on if your graphics card, processor, and amount of RAM support it, some of the "features," which are the usual cosmetic changes MS throws in to MAKE you think it has been improved simply by looking better, won't be supported. Which, of course, as we all know, these new cosmetic changes cause Windows to run slower and usually never work right, resulting in crashes of Windows Explorer. :wink:

 

 

The earlier proposed big change, some kind of new file system that basically said they were able to get any file made by an application on any computer on any file system, regardless, could be read on Vista. Yeah, right. Anyway, it won't be in there, and, IMO, that's for the better. Can you IMAGINE the sheer number of security holes such a concept would introduce? :o

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Grain,

 

 

 

 

 

A Windows Vista Capable PC includes at least:

  • A modern processor (at least 800MHz1).
  • 512 MB of system memory.
  • A graphics processor that is DirectX 9 capable.

 

 

 

A Windows Vista Premium Ready PC includes at least:

  • 1 GHz 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor1.
  • 1 GB of system memory.
  • Support for DirectX 9 graphics with a WDDM driver, 128 GB of graphics memory (minimum)2, Pixel Shader 2.0 and 32 bits per pixel.
  • 40 GB of hard drive capacity with 15 GB free space.
  • DVD-ROM Drive3.
  • Audio output capability.
  • Internet access capability.

Windows Vista Capable and Premium Ready footnotes

  • Processor speed is specified as the nominal operational processor frequency for the device. Some processors have power management which allows the processor to run at lower rate to save power.
  • If the GPU uses shared memory, then no additional graphics memory is required beyond the 1 GB system memory requirement; If the GPU uses dedicated memory then 128MB is required.
  • A DVD-ROM may be external (not integral, not built into the system).

or:

 

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsvista/getready/capable.mspx

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That's what Jobs never understood. It's a business. You can't control everything. Rockefeller understood he couldn't control the railroads and the banks, so he concentrated on kerosene (the first major market for petroleum products was kerosene for lamps, replacing whale oil, candles, etc). He forced the railroads to pay him "rebates" (what today we call extortion) but was smart enough not to try and take them over.

 

Gates understood that software was going to be what mattered.

 

Jobs wanted to monopolize everything, hardware, the OS and the apps.

 

Not.

 

Gates won because of superior understanding of the market place. (And millions of DOS machines to juryrig Windows on top of...).

 

If Jobs had licensed the Mac OS to all comers, it might be Cupertino--instead of Redmond--to which all turn the prayer rugs every morning. And it would be Lord Steve ducking pies, not Lord Bill.

 

Alas, greed to control everything almost inevitably leads to controlling nothing. Ask Napoleon, Alexander the Great, Charles XII, Hitler...

 

Capitalism at It's greatest.... :shifty:
Edited by Pain_Man
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I don't doubt your right. It's like any experiment. However, Redmond's wording is peculiar...

 

(Can you imagine being lucky enough to wander into a hole in the wall office in a Seattle suburb and applying for some flunky job at completely unknown company in, say, 1979??? There are hundreds of multi-millionaires who did that very thing. SONS OF BITCHES!!!)

 

Most likely, they mean the supply of available beta testing slots. Because, you have to understand how commercial beta testing is done. The number of testers is always limited because they need the number of samples in the set controlled. If the number varies or is never capped, then, people who, basically, cannot be monitored, controlled, selected for specific traits, etc. are allowed into the sample set. In other words, a REAL world return of user experiences would occur, as opposed to the ones the commercial software developer wants. ;)
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Most likely, they mean the supply of available beta testing slots. Because, you have to understand how commercial beta testing is done. The number of testers is always limited because they need the number of samples in the set controlled. If the number varies or is never capped, then, people who, basically, cannot be monitored, controlled, selected for specific traits, etc. are allowed into the sample set. In other words, a REAL world return of user experiences would occur, as opposed to the ones the commercial software developer wants. ;)
That makes sense but why didn't they just say that they limited the downloads to X number of people and that number has been reached? WAIT, I KNOW...BECAUSE IT'S MICROSOFT! :D:D
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