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Thats not really accurate actually. A drive is just a drive and doesn't care about the 'format' of the disc. It is up to your OS to be able to interpret what is on the disc called the 'filesystem'.

 

Any program like imgburn or maybe even a disk utility can 'discover' that there is some kind of data there (RAW form), however consoles now like the Wii, 360, and PS3 use a non-standard FS that only their respective consoles understand. The only way your drive on your PC can actually SEE any files from these discs if you have a driver that lets your OS be able to interpret correctly what is on said discs.

 

Also some discs are just produced in a more unconventional way (see Dreamcast GD-ROM Discs).

 

And actually, the oldest console that I know of that uses a FS not readable at all are discs from the 3DO Multiplayer console. Those discs cannot be read even in modern systems, merely because the FS does not contain a standard ISO9660 FS, but a FS call OperaFS.

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Thats not really accurate actually. A drive is just a drive and doesn't care about the 'format' of the disc. It is up to your OS to be able to interpret what is on the disc called the 'filesystem'.

 

Any program like imgburn or maybe even a disk utility can 'discover' that there is some kind of data there (RAW form), however consoles now like the Wii, 360, and PS3 use a non-standard FS that only their respective consoles understand. The only way your drive on your PC can actually SEE any files from these discs if you have a driver that lets your OS be able to interpret correctly what is on said discs.

 

Also some discs are just produced in a more unconventional way (see Dreamcast GD-ROM Discs).

 

And actually, the oldest console that I know of that uses a FS not readable at all are discs from the 3DO Multiplayer console. Those discs cannot be read even in modern systems, merely because the FS does not contain a standard ISO9660 FS, but a FS call OperaFS.

 

Well that is funny cause I just have one of those LG drives laying around and I hooked it up to this same computer with the same OS and guess what, I can see the files now. So what do you say about that?

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Rincewind,

 

That's not the case with Wii discs. The issue is a physical difference with the media (the way it's recorded/stamped or whatever - I don't know the specifics) and not anything to do with the file system.

 

Most drives can't initialise Wii discs (obviously my 99.9% comment wasn't ever intended to be an accurate figure, I said it to make a point) and that prevents any software from being able to do anything with them.

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