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Can I slow down the read speed when creating an image from an audio disc?


Muse
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Normally, I don't have difficulties. But am having a persistent problem with one disc today. It's Chuck Berry's The Great 28 CD. I've ripped with two different PCs using two different burners and the copies I've made consistently have a screeching sound for 10 or so seconds more than 1/2 way through the last track (i.e. track 28). When I play that track using the original disc, it's sounded fine to me using all drives and players. The rip to WAV of that track using Windows Media Player sounds even worse! But if I play the track using Windows Media Player (i.e. in real time) it sounds fine.  So, there's something about track #28 that's evidently giving problems and I figure if I can get Imgburn to rip at a slower speed it might produce copies that play OK. Is there a way to ask Imgburn to rip at a slower speed than it otherwise would? Here are the rippers I'm using with Windows 10 PC's:

Pioneer BDR-XS07S Silver 16X BD-R 2X BD-RE 16X DVD+R 12X BD-ROM 4MB Cache Serial ATA Revision 3.0 Blu-ray Burner.

LG WH16NS40 16x Internal Super Multi Blue Blu-ray Disc Rewriter (OEM Version)

Edited by Muse
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  • 11 months later...

EAC (Exact Audio Copy) is probably what you want to try for general audio CD ripping.

 

On 5/11/2021 at 8:31 PM, Muse said:

Is there a way to ask Imgburn to rip at a slower speed than it otherwise would?

Yeah, 'Mode > Read' and then on that same screen try setting it to 4x where it says 'Settings' and then where it says "Read Speed:" change the 2ND BOX to 4x which is for AUDIO (1st box is for data ripping).

because just putting in a CD-R (AUDIO CD) a moment ago, 4x is the slowest I can rip with ImgBurn on my Verbatim CD-R (CMC Magnetics) media.

Edited by ThaCrip
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Under Settings on the Read page of the software interface, there are 2 Read Speed options.  Change them to something slower.

 

Audio CD can be a real pain.  I had a disc just 2 or 3 weeks ago where reading to image was fine, but it didn't read it correctly.  When I used Free Audio Converter to extract the tracks, it failed a hash check because it was reading too fast.  So, I slowed down the read in ImgBurn to get an image that read correctly at the slowest possible speed.  Then, I mounted that image as a virtual drive for FreeAC to extract from.

 

Just be sure to change the read speed settings back, unless you want the slowest possible read speed on all operations.

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13 hours ago, dbminter said:

Audio CD can be a real pain.  I had a disc just 2 or 3 weeks ago where reading to image was fine, but it didn't read it correctly.  When I used Free Audio Converter to extract the tracks, it failed a hash check because it was reading too fast.  So, I slowed down the read in ImgBurn to get an image that read correctly at the slowest possible speed.  Then, I mounted that image as a virtual drive for FreeAC to extract from.

That's messed up.

but I guess lesson learned. so if someone wants to be safe on Audio CD's, it's probably best to try something like 4x right off the start as this way it reads slow, but won't take TOO long to read it.

but thanks for the info.

p.s. but typically I always keep my FLAC files and make custom audio CD's from them with ImgBurn as this way, even if a burned audio CD ever gets a little so-so, I can always make a reliable duplicate using the FLAC files that I know are good. but since I am on Linux I use Foobar2000 (which is the best general audio playback/conversion software if you ask me) to temporarily convert my FLAC back to WAV as ImgBurn can directly use WAV (standard 44.1Hz/16bit) without issue on Linux. but I did notice if I tried to use modified WAV files, like losslessly editing a WAV file to remove silence from the beginning/end of a track and then save it and try to use it with ImgBurn through Wine, that ImgBurn would throw a 'DirectShow' error basically upon attempting to read the WAV file in the burning process. but it seems as long as I am using a Wine version newer than Wine v4 series (I was using v4.0.4 when it had issues), like Wine v5 and I am currently using Wine v6.0.1 (v7 series is newest available Wine currently), that issue disappears and ImgBurn no longer throws that 'DirectShow' error as you could see it had trouble with the WAV files with Wine v4.0.4, but on say Wine v5 series and especially Wine v6.0.1 I no longer have trouble. I used the following link to trim my WAV files... https://forum.audacityteam.org/viewtopic.php?t=99503#p345303 ; I was editing it with Audacity and I even tried Ocenaudio with the same results. normally I don't modify lossless audio like that (I did not mess with my original FLAC files as I kept those unmodified, but I only modified the WAV that I was burning to a CD-R) but at the time I was trying to shave off a little time from a custom audio CD I was making so it was not too long since I was overburning beyond the normal 80min limit.

but speaking of overburning... I noticed those CMC Magnetics Verbatim CD-R 80min/700MB (CMC Magnetics media code ; which I recently bought from Amazon for pretty much $18 for a 100 CD-R's) tend to overburn further than pretty much everything else I tried in the past as I can overburn to at least 82min15sec (shows as '82:14:66' on ImgBurn) without issue (no errors whatsoever in ImgBurn when I tried it) as it shows up as 82min12sec on my original audio CD player which has a April 1991 mfg date on it (which I probably has since 1992) as it plays fine without issue. I burned them at 16x with my Sony Optiarc 7240s drive. I heard 16x is a pretty good start point for audio CD's since on the myce forums I heard someone claim that's probably fairly safe in terms of 'jitter' which I suspect stuff like audio CD's might be a bit more susceptible to as I heard you generally don't want to burn audio CD's at full speed (48x and the like) from what I read on myce forums.

so I got a little bonus with those Verbatim CD-R (CMC Magnetics media code), which I did not expect. because on most CD-R's off the top of my head, I would not feel comfortable attempting a overburn more than around 1min over the 80min limit otherwise I imagine ones chances of failure start to increase quite a bit. so I guess I could say this in terms of overburning audio CD's... 30seconds or so should be pretty safe as I would expect that to work on pretty much all CD-R media and I think there is a good chance of success around 1min over the 80min limit, but much beyond that there is probably a good chance of failure. so to see 82min15sec with no errors at all, I was a bit surprised. but I don't overburn all of the time as it's mostly good on the occasion your making a custom audio CD and you go a bit over the 80min limit so you don't have to remove a song for it to fit.

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For music CD's, I don't make image files.  I rip the tracks as FLAC.  Spoken word CD's are a bit different as if you rip them to containers and make new Audio CD's from those, you run the risk of added "skips" between audio tracks as the creation is seamless on the pressed discs, but not when you create the containers and add them.  And this is with the 2 second pause between tracks disabled.

 

Plus, for spoken word CD's, I generally make DVD Video out of them.  Yes, you can make DVD Video out of Audio CD contents.  :)  It's convenient because if you have, say, a 5 disc book on CD set, you can make an archive that spans only 1 DVD+R DL.  I've gotten up to 11 discs on one DVD+R DL before.  Saves space storing archives.  However, that requires ripping all CD tracks to one contiguous container file.  Or multiple files for, say, tracks that make up individual chapters.

 

That was the situation I encountered 2/3 weeks ago.  A BBC radio play on 3 Audio CD's I saved space on by converting it to 1 DVD+R DL.

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21 hours ago, dbminter said:

For music CD's, I don't make image files.  I rip the tracks as FLAC.

 

Yeah, basically same here. plus, it takes up less storage space that way to.

ill either use EAC (Exact Audio Copy), which also works on Linux Mint through Wine, or just copy the track directly from file manager to the hard drive, which gives you a standard WAV file, and then use Foobar2000 to compress it to FLAC (I typically use max compression of 8 ) etc.

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