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Question I/O error


britannia90
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Device error or disc error I/O error (E/S in Brazil) is shown while burning or reading or Verify within ImgBurn or not?

 

example: when copying file or folder example: cannot copy file ...zip the request cannot be executed due to an I/O device error (E/S  in Brazil)

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I/O error (E/S in Brazil) is an error that will always be shown when burning the DVD preventing the media from being burned and I think the burning is good but the burning is not good?

 

I/O error (E/S) is a corrupt file error or defective dvd drive or dvd media?

Edited by britannia90
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An I/O Error can be anything where a device (optical) reports an error processing a command.

If there’s a problem reading or writing a file on your storage device (hdd), the Window API function will also return an error and ImgBurn will display the details.

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If the burning of the dvd with imgburn is completed at 100% and the verify option of imgburn gives 0 errors then the file that was burnt on the DVD is integration without corruption and is the DVD optical media good burning done?

 

 

normally when i burn my dvd discs i use the verify option of imgburn and the scan read test of nero discspeed

Edited by britannia90
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a long time ago I burned some DVD media with imgburn and during burning it had I/O errors and I canceled so I used other media and the burning was completed but I didn't understand if the problem was in the file that was recorded on hdd if it was corrupted, if the error was in the media or if the error was in the dvd drive

 

my doubt was if whenever the I/O error (E/S) appears I will be notified

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I've already said what an I/O Error is (where ImgBurn is concerned).

On a more generalised note, I/O stands for Input / Output. It's the sending and receiving of commands / data to and from a device.

A drive isn't going to know if a file is corrupt (before/as it was written to it) - that's where CRC / MD5 / SHA-1 checks etc come in. In the case of a zip / rar file etc, the compression utils usually have a 'Test' feature built in that can be used to verify the contents of the compressed files.

If you download a file and want to check it's ok, check its MD5 / SHA-1 using a tool suitable for the job - something like HashTab perhaps. Once it has checked out 'ok', you're fine to burn it to disc and ImgBurn's burn+verify will let you know if what ends up on the disc doesn't match with what's on your hdd.

 

 

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You're basically repeating yourself again (or asking questions I've already answered) and I've warned you about repeatedly doing that in the past. Please stop or I'll ban this account too.

If the file was corrupt before you burnt it to disc, it'll still be corrupt on the disc and ImgBurn won't tell you about it (unless it's even more corrupt on the disc - then the statement below applies).

If the file on the disc is different to the one on your hdd, ImgBurn will tell you so as part of the verification process.

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Your hdd will report an error if it cannot write the data for some reason. It'll also report an error if it tries to read the data and detects that the data doesn't match with the ECC. HDDs also have spare blocks they can use in place of any sector that's found to be bad. The remapping of bad sectors is done automatically and you, the user, wouldn't know it's happening. S.M.A.R.T info can report on such remappings/reallocations.

So to sum up this topic (before it gets closed)...

Corrupt files stay corrupt. Test for corrupt files by checking the MD5 or SHA-1 against a known 'good' value (or by using the 'Test' feature of a compression tool if dealing with zip/rar archives etc.

If a storage device develops a bad sector and you attempt to read data from it, you'll be told about the problem.

If a storage device develops a bad sector and you attempt to write data to it, the device might try to remap the bad sector to a known good one, or it will error out and you'll be told about the problem.

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