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About padding


tom942
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Hello,

 

I've been reading all the threads that I could find about padding. I was looking for why is better to choose 50/50 with a huge amount of padding instead of 51/49 with a little one.

 

I read through several threads that 50/50 with the least padding is recommended (as I always try to do because I always burn seamless). Through the threads I found, I read that it is a recommendation from MCC (Mitsubishi Chemicals?) to burn equal data on both layers. That's the reason to choose 50/50, am I wrong?.

 

But also I read that if you choose 51/49, the drive will fill with zeros a layer (the second one I guess?) to equal the amount of data on both, and that is the reason that if you select 70/30 it takes a long time to synchronise and close.

 

So, what is the difference between select a layer break with a huge amount of padding or allow that the drive does the padding itself if after all the data that it will burn is the same?. Or do they both work in different ways?.

 

I've seen that if I use padding and it fills for instance 300 MB, the filesystem will take this amount of "data" into account, I mean real data is 5600 MB and with padding 5900 MB. If it is the drive what does the padding, will happen the same thing?.

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50/50 is recommended for greater compatibility with DVD players, as some of them refuse to play 70/30 discs for some reason/limitation. You don't have to take the 50/50 proportion to the heart though: 51/49 will also work fine. In fact, if you can, you should try a 70/30 burned dual-layer disc on your DVD player, and if it isn't jurassic, it'll probably play without problems.

 

By the way, having a lot or little padding doesn't (or at least shouldn't) make a difference to the DVD player.

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Thank you mmalves :).

 

So in summary,

 

The good way is try to burn 50/50 always except when the padding is huge (for instance, hundreds of MB only of padding).

 

This doubt came up with a DVD that I was backing up. In the "Create Layer Break Window", it says:

 

post-2088-1234801230_thumb.jpg

 

Then I was in doubt of use the second or the third option. Viewing that the padding is huge with the second one (50/50), a good one could be the third option , couldn

Edited by tom942
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Yes, the % column takes padding into account.

 

I guess the 5th option is the original disc's layerbreak (notice it has a Good rating and SPLIP is No). Having that many options I would choose the one where a slight pause would be less noticeable (fade-in/fade-out/scene change/etc). Again, if your DVD player isn't very old, having a lot of padding or not having a 50/50 distribution shouldn't matter :thumbup:

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Thanks mmvalves :).

 

Yes, the 5th is the original one :).

 

I burn the DVD's with seamless checked, so the pause it is not a problem. It was more a question about why it was recommended 50/50 although you have a huge amount of padding instead 51/49 with a little.

 

In other threads I read that the drive has to burn to equal the data on both layers to be with in the spec and that's the reason, for instance, why a disc takes longer to synchro and finalise if it is 70/30 instead if it is 50/50 disc. Is this right or did I undestand it wrongly?.

 

Then I thought, if it has to burn the same amount of data on both layers, which is the difference between let ImgBurn add padding or do it the drive itself, if at the end, you'll get a 50/50 burn?.

 

Regards :).

Edited by tom942
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If the drive does that by itself I don't know; to be honest, I've never heard about it :unsure:

 

ImgBurn uses padding at the filesystem level, which means it counts to the total size displayed by Windows and other programs. Now if the drive burns by itself to a 50/50 proportion (maybe for reflective purposes?) it'll do that without touching the filesystem, so, any device that looks in the filesystem (DVD players/computers/pretty much every DVD capable device) the disc will still be seen as a 70/30.

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