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can I copy my own personal SACD ?


rosanna
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Hi

I have bought Wish You Were Here Spec.Ltd.Edt.Sacd, CD / SACD hybrid, SACD  on Amazon for 160€

Might I ask if I could make a copy of it with imgburn (in my nation in Europe I can have and keep a copy of my original cd ) ?

any suggestion about imgburn settings ?

thanks

information about the sacd

Content:
          Stereo/Multichannel
Media:
          Hybrid
Recording type:
          
Recording info:
          5.1 surround mix by James Guthrie
Assistant engineer Joel Plante
Mastered by James Guthrie and Joel Plante
Mixed and mastered at das boot recording
DSD authoring for SACD by Gus Skinas

 

Edited by rosanna
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There should be nothing preventing ImgBurn from making a copy of the disc, physically.

 

The best thing to do is just try to make a copy.  If it doesn't work, the worst you're out is some time and one CD-R.  If you're worried about wasting a single CD-R, you can always try copying to a CD-RW first.

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8 hours ago, dbminter said:

There should be nothing preventing ImgBurn from making a copy of the disc, physically.

 

The best thing to do is just try to make a copy.  If it doesn't work, the worst you're out is some time and one CD-R.  If you're worried about wasting a single CD-R, you can always try copying to a CD-RW first.

Hi

I know many users can rip it with foobar2000 and i guess with isobuster

maybe using a blue ray burner or dvd burner and not a cd

i guess the sacd is a dvd ,isn't it

thanks

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12 hours ago, rosanna said:

I know many users can rip it with foobar2000 and i guess with isobuster

I just generally manipulate basic audio data with Foobar2000. Foobar2000 is my 'go to' program for listening to music (FLAC/MP3/AAC/Opus etc) and basic conversion (i.e. lossless (FLAC etc) to lossy(MP3/AAC etc)). it even works on Linux (setup through Wine) even though it's a Windows program.

but it just depends on how picky someone is with keeping the copy as close/identical to original as possible. but generally speaking once you get audio in FLAC format you can keep these files for long term storage since the audio is identical to the actual audio CD (assuming it was ripped from a actual audio CD in the first place). so if you burn a basic audio CD using these files, the audio quality will be the same as your original audio CD.

but for more audiophile/picky types of people... EAC (Exact Audio Copy) is the standard people use to make a proper copy of general music CD's. but even with this... in the real world, there is basically no noticeable differences here in terms of the audio quality of the music, assuming your CD drive read the music data half way decently in the first place when making your WAV/FLAC files. like say you ripped a song to WAV/FLAC format with a random program and then used EAC to do the same, there is no noticeable difference in audio quality since it's a lossless format at the end of the day. I guess with EAC it might be less likely a read error would occur on the disc, but still, a typical audio CD and typical CD/DVD drive should be able to read these decently to where this is not likely to be a issue.

personally if I was to rip my original audio CD's, I would probably use EAC to get the basic WAV/FLAC data off of them, but then dump the excess details that the cue file stores with gaps etc which is not really needed anyways unless you are more of a perfectionist. but I think for the most part there is not many whole albums that just about every song is good on them. so when I burn audio CD's from time to time in fairly recent memory I just tend to make custom CD's using FLAC files as sound quality will be as good as original CD anyways since it's a lossless format at the end of the day.

p.s. but for a basic copy, I would assume what dbminter said summed it up.

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Actually, I did not know what an SACD was and having looked it up, it may not be possible to copy those with ImgBurn.

 

Super Audio CD may actually be a DVD format.  So, it should be possible to copy those.  I really shouldn't say they can't be copied.  I worry if a copy can be played in a standalone SACD player.  I doubt they were designed to reflect recordable media in mind since the hardware preceded the recordable DVD format.

 

And there was mention of something called a Hybrid Disc which appears to have a CD and a DVD layer.  I doubt those could be copied.

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10 hours ago, dbminter said:

Actually, I did not know what an SACD was and having looked it up, it may not be possible to copy those with ImgBurn.

 

Super Audio CD may actually be a DVD format.  So, it should be possible to copy those.  I really shouldn't say they can't be copied.  I worry if a copy can be played in a standalone SACD player.  I doubt they were designed to reflect recordable media in mind since the hardware preceded the recordable DVD format.

 

And there was mention of something called a Hybrid Disc which appears to have a CD and a DVD layer.  I doubt those could be copied.

Hi

i guess i need a special reader like sony or oppo (there is a list of equipment ) to rip and copy correctly 

after i can burn with imgburn , i guess the problem is that the blue ray/dvd burners for pc are not able to read the sacd layer with 4 or 5 channels

that's a pitty i spent 160€ for this cd 😒

thanks

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