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DLT2DVD

HOW TO BURN FROM DLT TAPES

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Can we use Imgburn to burn DVD content stored in DLTtape III into DVD-R.

If so how can this be done.

Is there an already existing guide for this ??? :wub:

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Which software did you use to create your DLT tape?

 

 

I did not create the DLT tape. It has been given to me to be transfered to DVD-R. :geek:

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:blush:

I guess you take it off the tape, make sure it's an image and then burn it.

 

 

What happens if it is CSS protected ?

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What happens if it is CSS protected ?

then we can't help you on this forum

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What happens if it is CSS protected ?

then we can't help you on this forum

 

 

CAn you please direct me to the right forum.......... :blush:

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What's DLT tape ? :unsure:

Usualy used for large backups LFC, anywhere from 20 to 40 or even 80GB of data can be stored on them pending on the type you use, commonly used in large networks.

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Dave Lee Travis recordings from years ago?

If it is, let's hope it's encrypted with something that'll never, ever be cracked in the history of the world. Ever!

 

BTW, a DLT tape couldn't be CSS-encrypted. That's DVD-only.

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Cheers Ken !!

 

@corny & digi - wasn't he the big hairy moose from old school Radio 1 ?

 

_1603077_totpdlt_150.jpg

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If any of this info is off limits, moderators please edit or remove.

 

The DLT tape itself will most likely not be CSS encrypted. The encryption process generally happens at the replication plant when they create the glass master. The keys are added at this point. Since they are so expensive, almost no DVD authoring facilities can afford to purchase the keys.

 

If the intent was for this DVD to be CSS encrypted, the sector size written to the DLT will be 2054 rather than 2048. The 6 extra bytes per sector are where the CSS keys are written. 2048 is currently the only allowable sector size for recordable DVD's.

 

If you read back the DLT (using Gear, Eclipse, your favorite authoring software, or other) you will get three files. CONTROL.DAT, DDPID.DAT and MAIN.DAT (sometimes MAIN.IMG) The only one you need to be concerned with will be the largest MAIN.DAT. The other two you can throw away. Rename the file with an IMG suffix and open in ImgBurn. When you try to burn it will inform you that it has a 2054 sector size and it will just cut off the extra. Say OK and burn away. Some players may complain that the copy protect flag is on (Quicktime) but the info isn't copy protected. This is fixable, but not on this forum.

 

If you are trying to restore a DVD-9 (you will have two DLT's) then you will need to combine the two files together. The simplest way to do this is using the dos "copy" command. "copy /b layer0.dat + layer1.dat fullimage.img" Layer0.dat is the first layer, layer1.dat is the second layer and fullimage.img is the complete image fill output. You need to use the /b command to do a binary copy append. You can use ImgBurn to find a layer break, or you can calculate the layer break by dividing the layer0 file size by 2054 or 2048 where applicable to get the number of sectors on the first layer. This method is only a problem if the intent of the author was for the final pressed disc to be written PTP and the size of layer 1 is larger than layer 0.

 

I hope this helps. Good luck!

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You could also make a .dvd file (plain text file with .dvd file extension) containing the text:

 

layer0.dat

layer1.dat

 

 

or use the 'create dvd mds file' feature, add the two files and make a .mds file. Then load the .mds file in Write mode.

 

Then imgburn will treat the 2 files as a single large file.

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