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question PIE, PIF, jitter errors


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M-Disc DVD produces many PIE, PIF, jitter errors after burning files? on DVD M-Disc discs stored for long periods without use do PIE, PIF, jitter errors increase more compared to moderately used discs?

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Of course, nothing is perfect. Like I said, the ‘amount’ of errors depends on your drive and how well it can burn them. Some will be better at burning them than others.

Btw, if you just ask the same question over and over again, I’ll simply ban this new account you’ve made too.

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i store files on mdisc dvd for a few years but the only test i ran was read test 100% good but i don't know if it's recommended to do these pie, pif and jitter tests before storing m-discs for the long term?

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As they’re meant to last for hundreds of years, I doubt it makes much difference to you if you used a simple ‘read’ operation to check the disc or if you look at pif type levels.

If it passes a read operation now, it’ll still do so in 50 years time.

That said, if you have the ability to scan for such info, why risk the long term archiving of important data on a disc that is of immediately questionable readability?

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I've been burning optical discs since 2000, the early days of CD-R.  I've never cared a jot about PIE, PIF, and jitter values.  As long as they pass Verify/Read tests, that's good enough for me.  And if they're DVD Video discs, a play of all contents on a standalone DVD player.  The PIE/PIF/jitter values probably don't really come into play in terms of how long a disc will last before it's not readable.  A disc will simply become unreadable based on the quality of its dye/metallic oxide.  And it's an all or nothing situation, usually.  Cheap media will become completely unreadable after like a year or so.  Some media will have just a few sectors become unreadable, but if you're not using CMC discs, you generally don't have to worry about discs dying unless your burner doesn't like the dye on that particular disc.  Which you'll generally know if it doesn't the minute Write or Verify fails for a particular brand.

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thank you for the explanation I had CMC discs in 2013 but today I have M-Disc DVD Verbatim and I burned files on it in your opinion M-Disc has more resistance than other discs in glue and polycarbonate?

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Before I was told about the evils of CMC, I spent about $2,000 in discs, new burners, and new DVD video recorders trying to figure out why my discs that had worked fine for so long stopped working.  The answer was Optodisc switched to CMC and I never used an Optodisc product again.  And now, Optodisc is out of the optical disc business; good riddance!

 

I've only burned a few M-Discs so I don't know from experience.  Plus, my M-Disc are nowhere near as old as they need to be to prove any of the claims the manufacturer makes.  However, the theory behind M-Discs versus organic dye is that M-Disc is basically akin to a process of chipping pits in stone versus burning ink.  So, theoretically, M-Disc should be able to back up its claims.  And as long as they make hardware that supports DVD+R reading, M-Disc will never go obsolete.

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I would think to contact the M-Disc Verbatim DVD manufacturer but I don't know the actual manufacturer of this disc in 2016

 

i have stored two asus internal sata dvd drives model DRW-24F1MT/BLK/B/AS and i wanted to keep them for future use

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