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gamercr7
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There is no best. Not for anything. 'best' is relative. What may work for one user may not work for you at all. There's too many variables. Your blanks, the type, your burner, the firmware,... Default usually works fine. You don't give up do you? Always more questions 'what's best for this, what's best for doing that...'. maybe you should read post 74 again.

 

Sent from my Nexus 6P with Tapatalk.

Edited by Ch3vr0n
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Basically what lightning and I have said a few times now but you still refuse to read, maybe caps will help. THE DEFAULT SETTINGS USUALLY WORK FINE FOR MAXIMUM COMPATIBILITY. Stop messing with things or risk creating issues. Repeatedly asking the same things over and over will not change the previous answers.

 

Sent from my Nexus 7 (2013) with Tapatalk

Edited by Ch3vr0n
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  • 2 weeks later...

I tested jitter, PIE, PIF on the others dvd-r 16x verbatim azo mcc03rg20 and I wanted the opinion of you if these discs were good burned or badly burned and if these discs will die early or will last for decades, They were burned in 6x using imgburn and drive liteon ihas122-14 FU, photos:

post-55768-0-43364300-1483789094_thumb.jpgpost-55768-0-76792900-1483789110_thumb.jpgpost-55768-0-15746000-1483789117_thumb.jpgpost-55768-0-32515400-1483789122_thumb.jpg

Edited by gamercr7
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The one with a total of 688675 PI Errors is obviously your best one. The others are pretty much the same or worse than the scan you posted in post #13. If you refer back to that post (and my reply), you'll see that your error levels are still a lot higher than I'd personally expect and want.

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1 I do not know why so much difference between the scans of the disks I burned all of them equally in 6x, it's very strange, would it be a problem in the drive?

 

2 I bought mdisc and I wanted to know what the ideal burning speed for it being that 4x is the maximum supported speed for writing in mdisc, should I burn mdisc in 4x?

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1. It could be the drive or it could be the discs. Without trying different ones of each, you'll never know.

 

2. As I've said before, I can't answer that. Where a drive reports it can burn a disc at various speeds, you have to burn one (some) at each supported speed and then check them using the 'Disc Quality' PIPO scan. Examine the results and work out which speed produces the best burns.

 

If you're saying mdisc burns at a maximum speed of 4x, I very much doubt you'd be offered anything other than 4x. In which case, you have no option but to burn at 4x.

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1 mdisc can be burned in 1x or 2x but its maximum burning speed is 4x, is it better to burn mdisc in 4x or 2x or 1x? In theory what would be the ideal?

 

2 is it possible to test the burning quality at certain speed without burning a disc? But use a burned or virgin disk?

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Mdisc verbatim dvdr never deteriorates? They also have jitter, PIE, PIF, POF errors

 

My drive is a Lite-On iHAS122-14 FU firmware version: EL06 it is not possible to choose a speed for mdisc to burn better? Mdisc only 2 options 2x or 4x, in your opinion what would be the best burning?

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Everything deteriorates.  2nd law of thermodynamics.  However, mDisc is rated to last like 500 years, so it will outlive you.  IF its estimated lifespan holds up.

 

 

EDIT: Well, I shouldn't have said everything deteriorates according to the 2nd law of thermodynamics.  Only every closed system deteriorates.  Not every system is closed.  For instance, people are a closed system, but the planet isn't.

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You ask for my opinion and then just ignore it anyway. I'd do exactly what I've been telling you to do... burn a disc at each speed.

 

I'd probably start with 4x though. It'll mean I don't have to wait so long to check the disc.

 

Please don't think for a second that I know the optimal write speed for every drive/firmware/media combo. I don't.

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This is going beyond the scope of intent here, but a closed system in thermodynamics is any physical system that does not allow the transfer of energy or mass into or out of the system.  I've always been a little confused on the subject because humans are closed systems, yet, if you ask me, we're constantly allowing heat out of our bodies.  So, I don't see why we're closed systems.  As for the mDisc since it doesn't allow mass or energy into or out of it that it retains, it's a closed system.

 

 

Basically, the whole thermodynamics thing I was just using to say mDiscs do deteriorate because, in essence, "all" matter deteriorates because of the 2nd law of thermodynamics.  It's why living organisms die.  Every closed system in the universe is heading towards a state of chaos, and you cannot stop it.  The best you can do is slow down the rate of decay.  So, yes, mDiscs deteriorate.  However, they deteriorate at a much less rate than organic dye based recordable discs.  Dyes decay much faster because they're organic compounds.  mDisc is, essentially, like using the laser to burn pits into stone.  Stone will last much longer than organic dye, but even stone eventually decays.

 

 

You can trust Milenniata as far as you can trust anyone.  It hasn't been hundreds of years since the introduction of mDisc, so there's no way to verify their claims.  I do know that the metallic oxide on BD-R's has been good for at least 5 years, since discs I burned 5 years ago are still readable.  And BD-R will last longer than organic dye discs.  So, mDisc should last longer than that.

 

 

If you're really worried, then, just burn at 2x.  It will take longer, but the burn should be "better" off in terms of being able to get a good read out of them.  I've had no problems with 4x mDisc burns, but I've only burned like less than 5 of them.  And I haven't had a need to restore data from them yet to test how good they are at being read.

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1 Thanks for the explanation, Millenniata says that MDisc have been tested and have a life expectancy of 1000 years at 25 ° C 50% RH, maybe this is lie or marketing

 

2 Did you burn mdisc in 4x? What results jiter, PIE, PIF did you get?

 

 

3 Burning mdisc at 2x causes increased stress and heat on polycarbonate and materials because the laiser acts for more minutes at 4x the laser acts less minutes?

Edited by gamercr7
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Well, they've been tested, but obviously not for a thousand years as 1,000 years haven't even passed since the development on the compact disc.  What they've done is simulate the conditions of X amount of time before a failure and then multiplied it by the factor they experimented for.  DOESN'T mean they'll last that long.  They rarely do.  Recordable DVD media was initially rated to last 100 years, but actual experience was some were failing at 10.  So, whatever they say it will last for will most likely NOT last for that long.

 

 

I'm pretty sure at 4x.  I set my writes to Max, but what write rate you get is down to various factors beyond your control.  I don't bother with jitter, etc.  As long as it burns and passes Verify, I've rarely had a disc that wasn't readable afterwards.  If they were unreadable, it was because they were junk media before I learned they were junk media.  I use Verbatim DataLife Plus media so it does fairly well and I don't have to worry about all those confusing graphs.  For instance, I only had 1 MKM Verbatim DataLife Plus DVD+R DL that had 1 unreadable sector years later after it passed burn and verify.  The other DVD+R DL's that failed were because they were Ritek media and no good, as I later learned.

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Does millenniata testing not fit for durability in mdisc years? They will last well less than 1000 years? Maybe 10 or 20

 

I do worry about jitter, pie, pif because I burned dvd-r verbatim azo mcc 03rg20 and got bad values jitter, pie, pif, you can see in that topic that I posted the photos

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The best test is a real world test.  Pop the disc into a DVD player and test play every single option through to the end.  If it plays fine, it should last fine.  Granted, this isn't a fool proof test.  However, I find all those fancy graphs to be highly overrated.  I've rarely read one and even those I've read, I still don't understand what they really mean.  I know high values aren't good, but WHY are high values not good?  What exactly does a high jitter mean in terms of how well a disc will last?  So, I don't follow the graphs at all.

 

 

As for any testing, you can't say something will last for 1,000 years until a thousand years have passed.  And since it's not practical to wait a thousand years, all those fancy tests merely simulate X amount of time of various conditions.  Real world is the real deal, and they don't perform real world tests because, as I said, you can't wait 1,000 years to find the results because the item won't be "profitable" by that amount of time.  And that's all they care about.

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