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dbminter

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Everything posted by dbminter

  1. dbminter

    Imgburn error while verifying sectors.

    Yeah, if you can buy blanks one at a time, that's definitely cheaper. However, be aware the nature of the beast means one disc can work fine and then the next won't.
  2. dbminter

    Imgburn error while verifying sectors.

    You're probably more likely than other to find the drive is the problem. I'd start with the drive first and then work on the discs. Although it is cheaper to try the discs first, probably. However, if the problem lies with the burner, you've got to replace it anyway, and you're out extra money for the discs. And the discs you try may not work right with the new burner. It's the nature of the beast, unfortunately.
  3. dbminter

    Imgburn error while verifying sectors.

    I can't guarantee a new burner will solve the problem, though. If you get a new one AND it's different than the last one you had and you still get problems, then the next step would be to try swapping out the Verbatim DVD+R for something else. Maybe Taiyo Yuden DVD+R if they make them. Or try Verbatim DVD-R. I eventually had to switch to TY DVD-R because the LG WH16NS60 stopped liking anything from Verbatim that was DVD+R or DVD-R.
  4. dbminter

    Imgburn error while verifying sectors.

    Well, if you've been using this same burner for 4 years, I would definitely look to try to replace it first. Since it's USB, if I remember correctly, it's easy to swap out for a new one. And, to be honest, it's where I'd start first. Given how relatively cheap USB DVD burners are, too. And you can't necessarily write off the discs. If you just started this package of discs, Verbatim could have changed the manufacturing process. They apparently did with DVD+R because my 2nd to last batch of Verbatim DVD+R worked fine in the LG WH16NS60, but the last batch I bought all failed miserably.
  5. dbminter

    Imgburn error while verifying sectors.

    Well, you're not using crap discs, so that's not the problem. You say you've had no problems thus far and it just started up? Have you always used these same discs or did you just start recently using them? Even though they're quality discs, your drive may still not like them, like the LG WH16NS60 does. If you've used these discs fine before and now you're getting problems, how long have you been using this DVD burner? It may have just given up the ghost.
  6. dbminter

    Cannot limit/set auto-verify read speed

    Just a guess; LUK will have to verify or deny it, but that Tools read speed option may only affect Read mode operations. Meaning when you're creating an image from a disc. I don't know, but it may not affect Verify rates. However, a Verify is, in essence, a Read operation.
  7. dbminter

    Cannot limit/set auto-verify read speed

    Oh, I think I misunderstood what you were asking. Any operation, read or write, will effectively start at 0x and gradually increase to, say, the 4x you set. The speed of any operation will also fluctuate, depending on a variety of factors.
  8. dbminter

    Cannot limit/set auto-verify read speed

    Like I said, a disc may be rated for X, but the write strategy in the firmware may allow for slower or faster speeds. A lot of 6x rated BD-R will burn at 12x in most drives. My LG will do that. It depends on the firmware write strategies. You said this drive had some kind of quiet setting? You could try disabling it. I always disabled the Quiet mode on my Pioneer drives to get faster read speeds. I don't care if my drive makes noise. I want the fastest speed I can get out of it. ImgBurn has some advanced settings for certain manufacturers like Pioneer where you can disable the quiet setting. Otherwise, the manufacturer of your drive may have a utility of its own to do that. Pioneer also makes its own utility for changing drive settings, but ImgBurn can do them, too, with its Advanced functions.
  9. dbminter

    Cannot limit/set auto-verify read speed

    Drives behave based on their firmware for a particular medium and the read/write strategies set on the disc. So, even though a disc may say it supports a slower speed, it actually only supports the lowest possible speed defined in the firmware for that medium and the read/write strategies on the disc.
  10. dbminter

    Cannot limit/set auto-verify read speed

    The bottom line is the drive itself controls what it does based on its firmware and the strategies set on the disc in the drive. The best you can do is set the speed and hope you get it.
  11. dbminter

    create iso bootable from usb multiboot with img burn

    If you're trying to create a bootable USB, as I said, ImgBurn won't do that.
  12. dbminter

    Device Not Ready (Unable to Recover TOC)

    When you say the TOC message appears in the bottom left, I'm not entirely sure where you're talking about. Does this happen when you try to insert a disc or when you're actually performing a Read operation? If it's a Read operation, copy and paste the entirety of the failed Read operation log. And does this happen on all game discs or just this one? Also what game discs? PC? Some kind of proprietary system like a PS2 or XBox? Never mind, I think I see where you're talking about now. The bottom left corner of the top window, the main window. Where certain output messages appear. So, you're not actually performing a Read operation, just inserting discs. Do you get this same TOC message on other types of discs? Non game CD's or DVD's? If you get the same message repeatedly on other types of discs, I'd blame the slim model drive you got. Try another different manufactuer's one or buy a half height model and put in it an external enclosure.
  13. dbminter

    create iso bootable from usb multiboot with img burn

    I am guessing you're wanting to use ImgBurn to create a bootable ISO from or to a USB flash drive? If so, you can't do that with ImgBurn. ImgBurn only reads/writes to optical discs for images.
  14. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    Hm, unfortunately, it saying SPTI is really less helpful than it seems on the surface. I was hoping it was saying something other than that to explain how ImgBurn can read the discs. I would have hoped that enabling SPTI would fail to read discs in ImgBurn, but one of the other interfaces like ElbyCDIO was working.
  15. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    If you are going to use my method, you'll probably need a USB HDD. I have 4.6 TB of Reflect backups. That was probably why I needed GPT. To format a partition larger than 4 TB just for Reflect backups.
  16. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    I'm rather paranoid in my imaging schedule. An image is done every day at 9:45 AM, one image set for each of all the 7 days of the week. Then, a Weekly image is done, 4 of those on Day 7, 14, 21, and 28. Then there are the 12 Monthly images done on Day 1 of each month. Each of those Monthly images is then copied as a backup to a USB SSD. Then, on Day 1 in January, the Yearly image is done, which is also copied to a USB SSD as well as a flash drive. That way, I have a fairly decent range of times I can restore back to without losing too much info. Then, twice a year, with the new Windows 10 Refreshes, I restore down Basic Systems Re-Installs, update Windows 10 to the latest version, update all software from my TO-DO.TXT file, install any new software, and make any configuration changes. Then, I make a new Basic Systems Re-Installs image, copying the old one to an archive folder on a USB SSD. When I get a new computer, the first thing I do before starting Windows for the first time is to boot my Macrium Reflect Rescue Media on it and image the entire PC drive(s) contents. That way, I've got a factory default image. Then, my comprehensive INSTALL.TXT file tells me what to install when and how to configure it. At approximately 15 different places along the way, temporary Re-Installs images are done. This way, if I later discover a problem occurred between X steps, I can restore back to X, fix the problem, and continue on with the set up.
  17. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    The very nature of the beast that is Windows means you can just be sitting there and something goes wrong in the background. Often times, you will never notice one of these failures until you actually encounter it. Meaning, you won't know how long its been there. So your images, depending on your schedule, may have backed up these changes without your knowing it. If you have to do the drastic thing and reinstall Windows, do what I do. After you've reinstalled it and every piece of software and made all your configuration changes, take an image of Windows. This way, you may not need to reinstall everything if something like this happens again. You can just restore this, what I call Basic Systems Re-Installs Image, and you can just update it with new software updates and installations and configuration changes. Since you said you do take system images, might as well take advantage of doing so so you won't have to reinstall everything again.
  18. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    It must be some kind of Windows problem. Maybe a configuration one. If ImgBurn can read the discs to image files, then the problem lies with Windows itself. When you first start ImgBurn, at the end of the log, there should be something that resembles this: I 11:28:28 Initialising SPTI... I 11:28:28 Searching for SCSI / ATAPI devices... I 11:28:28 -> Drive 1 - Info: ELBY CLONEDRIVE 1.4 (N:) (SCSI) I 11:28:28 -> Drive 2 - Info: ELBY CLONEDRIVE 1.4 (L:) (SCSI) I 11:28:28 -> Drive 3 - Info: ELBY CLONEDRIVE 1.4 (Q:) (SCSI) I 11:28:28 Found 3 BD-ROM/HD DVD-ROMs! What do you have for the Initialising line? Do you have something other than SPTI? SPTI is Microsoft's driver. If you don't have that one enabled, that might explain while ImgBurn works and Windows isn't. If you don't have SPTI and have something else, I wonder if changing the driver to SPTI would cause ImgBurn to fail to read discs.
  19. dbminter

    Cleaning Up random crashes

    LUK, you know how sometimes I send logs of ImgBurn crashes on closing down of the application? I've been paying closer attention and this seems to happen at the Cleaning Up phase listed in the application on closing. Don't know if that's actually when it's crashing, but it could be a clue. You remember those crashes where you couldn't find anything out of the ordinary, but they've been randomly happening for years?
  20. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    When you say pre-recorded, do you mean pressed DVD's like movies you buy in a store or Amazon or do you mean discs you've already written yourself in a burner?
  21. OIC, by double density, you meant a double layer DVD. A DVD+R DL. (Possibly DVD-R DL, but those are less common, and they were uncommon to begin with.) Yeah, Windows 10 will natively read a double layer DVD as long as the USB DVD drive you get supports reading DVD+R. And almost all DVD burners today support both DVD-R and DVD+R, and even DVD-RAM. So, any DVD burner should do. A relatively inexpensive drive should do the trick. Avoid really older ones because they may not support double layer discs. I still install ImgBurn on new systems. Every one I get. Of course, I beta test the software. But, even then, I still use it a lot for data archiving. Mostly BD-R now.
  22. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    I can't see Microsoft dropping support for ISO9660. It would pretty much kill backwards compatibility. Plus, older install discs may be ISO9660 and not UDF. I decided to create an ISO9660 image and burn it to a test DVD+RW to see if my Windows 10 2004 build can read it. I burned it and was able to load a .LOG file and read it fine from the ISO9660 disc I created from an image I wrote in ImgBurn. So, it's not that Microsoft removed ISO9660 backwards compatibility in Windows 10 2004.
  23. First, I don't know what you mean by a double density CD. I don't believe I've ever heard of such of such a thing. Double density floppy disks, yes, but those are ancient history. Second, I don't see why you feel the need to install ImgBurn on the Windows 10 system to get it to read a CD. As long you have a CD drive somewhere connected, internal or external, Windows should read that disc natively. I'd just recommend getting a cheap USB CD drive, connect it up, let Windows 10 detect it, insert this CD you want to get the files off of, and copy them over from the CD drive with File Explorer. Beyond that, I don't see what issue you'd be having here.
  24. dbminter

    Completely stumped

    I would say the drive is probably not the problem because, from what I gathered from his post, File Explorer shows no inserted disc, but ImgBurn can read discs to image files fine. Have you tried restarting the computer? When I get a case where File Explorer fails to see inserted discs, a reboot usually fixes that. And does File Explorer show any inserted disc and when you try clicking on it, File Explorer shows an empty directory?
  25. dbminter

    How to copy a DVD

    Starting with Windows 8, I think (Definitely Windows 10.), Microsoft removed native playback of DVD's from Windows. So, all modern PC's will need some kind of software installed. My Dell came with a version of PowerDVD, but I don't use it to play my DVD's. I use a freebie called Media Player Classic Home Cinema.
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